1
\$\begingroup\$

I disassembled a blender and removed the motor. It is a universal-type motor, and it appears that there are different taps on the field coil for different speed settings (I never really understood why blenders have so many speed settings). I was wondering if anyone had a schematic for this type of motor, or an explanation for how it works? If you reduce the strength of the field coil the torque will be reduced, but the unloaded speed will actually increase right?

I found a partial schematic of a similar blender, but it doesn't show the actual field coil connections: enter image description here

Also, there is a diode present on the switch panel. There is a high and a low speed range, each range has 4 speeds. I believe that for the low speed range setting the diode is put in series with the field coil so that it is only powered for 1/2 the cycle.

\$\endgroup\$
3
  • \$\begingroup\$ Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. \$\endgroup\$
    – Community Bot
    Oct 28, 2021 at 18:03
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Blenders have lots of speeds because it is the only additional feature anyone could think of to sell a low, medium and premium model to get you to pay more for more "speeds". I think the blender needs a load to spin slower on the lower speed settings. \$\endgroup\$ Oct 28, 2021 at 19:09
  • \$\begingroup\$ Premium blenders can turn vegetables into hot soup from the power of the churning \$\endgroup\$ Oct 29, 2021 at 5:33

1 Answer 1

3
\$\begingroup\$

The most common types now are Triac phase-controlled, but yours appears like a multi-tap transformer for the stator field windings to reduce the voltage which controls RPM for a defined slip ratio at excitation frequency.

enter image description here

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p8jlljC3Hkk

Watch the video for details

The 2P4T switch + turbo , I have coloured to show how power is selected in each position. The smaller and shorter path of series inductance , the lower the voltage drop to the armature and more to the motor, thus more torque less RPM slip with Turbo.

enter image description here

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge that you have read and understand our privacy policy and code of conduct.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.