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I am kind of new to electronics, and I wanted to make sure that I am not doing something dumb.

My SO and I work on one big desk, 177 inches / 4.5 meters long. It has a metal frame and a MDF desktop.

For lighting, we got a self-adhesive 20ft COB LED lighting strip, and a 24V 48W 2A power supply. We want to stick the strip on the back of the desk, the MDF / faux wood part.

We cut the strip and soldered a piece of 22 AWG black/red wire in between (for design purposes,) and insulated the wires and soldered parts with electrical tape. After this the strip works and looks great.

Is this a safe / good idea? I have some worries about the strip coming loose and touching the metal frame, or being crushed between the desk and the wall, etc. I have no experience with LED strips, and the copper connections inbetween make me kind of uneasy. I know 24V is not a lot, but I also thought it was more about the amperes that makes it unsafe.

The power supply we want to use has overcurrent-, overvoltage-, overload-, and short-circuit protection, which should be more then enough to make sure the strip wouldn't get too hot / start a fire, right?

All in all, I don't know enough about electrical engineering to feel totally comfortable, and I don't want to be responsible for any dumbassery that will get my SO hurt or anything. Is this setup safe to use, did I overlook something, or is there anything else I can do?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ No worries, just don’t lick on both polarities on an exposed end. \$\endgroup\$
    – winny
    Dec 20, 2021 at 19:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ Re that Power supply: although it says it has a protected output, I'd be careful & not rely on that. I'd insert a fuse in series with its output. \$\endgroup\$
    – Rich S
    Dec 20, 2021 at 22:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ because, their claims seem to be super-glorious & boilerplate...and I doubt it would survive a temperature above the melting point of Aluminum: "The products adopt the industry's top materials and processes, flame retardant shell resistant to high temperature of 1382℉, premium-quality components and safe & reliable power cord. Certified by FCC, CE, RoHS, CCC, Overcurrent protection, overvoltage protection and overload protection, short-circuit protection ensure the stability and smoothness." \$\endgroup\$
    – Rich S
    Dec 20, 2021 at 22:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ In regards to inserting a fuse: how would I go about that? Is it better to use another output that already has that? Do you have any suggestions for a good / reliable one? \$\endgroup\$ Dec 21, 2021 at 5:13

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Yes, that should be safe as the supply is double insulated as it has this marking:

enter image description here

enter image description here

Which means that it is constructed such that the output connector will not carry dangerous voltages.

In the worst case some voltage still might couple through but the current will not exceed dangeous levels.

So should be safe, there is no issue even if the metal case touches the connections in the LED strip.

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You'll be fine. The circuits on that strip is encapsulated (according to the photos in the link). So no risk of shorting. The power supply is also internally protected against shorts on its output.
24Vdc is below the safety UL limit, so does not present a user hazard for shocking.
However if you feel the need to put it to your tongue, you will feel a tingle.

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24V is safe if the power supply is properly double isolated. Just don't lick it.

Sticking LED strip on metal is normal. Low-power LED strips for decoration can be used on other materials, but higher power ones for lighting require cooling, which is usually done by sticking them on an aluminium profile. Here are a few examples that might give you ideas. Aluminium profiles usually come with a diffuser to hide the LEDs from direct view, but in your case they're on the back of furniture, so that's not necessary.

If you cut it to length and stick it on metal, you should be careful about the exposed copper at the ends. You can put a bit of kapton tape below just at the end to isolate it from the metal.

If you already stuck the strip on MDF, then it'll have to stay there. Just check it doesn't get too hot. It'll be fine.

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