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Chip design engineers use software for laying out the wire routing and connections of transistors, to make standard cells or higher logic/functional components, where the distinction between different interconnect layers is based on the colors with which they are denoted.

If so, does an applicant have a right to ask for employment due to laws of diversity on the basis of physical impairment (in this case, color blindness)?

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    \$\begingroup\$ I’m voting to close this question because it would be a decision for the employer. \$\endgroup\$
    – Solar Mike
    Dec 25, 2021 at 11:15
  • \$\begingroup\$ Did my apprenticeship with a panel beater who told me his dream was to be a vehicle electrician but could not as he was colour blind - I was the vehicle electrician at the time - so sad, but he was a good panel beater... \$\endgroup\$
    – Solar Mike
    Dec 25, 2021 at 11:17
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    \$\begingroup\$ That would depend on the law of the land you are in, the feasibility of adapting tooling to make one's specific physical impairment irrelevant, and on an employer's opinions, wishes, and inclinations. I don't think a general answer to this question is possible. \$\endgroup\$
    – ocrdu
    Dec 25, 2021 at 11:25
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    \$\begingroup\$ If someone with colour blindness didn't realize that the software has self-checking connectivity-proving algorithms (that also overcomes human frailties) then, they would be highly likely to be disqualified on the basis that they have no relevant experience or they are a potential trouble causer. \$\endgroup\$
    – Andy aka
    Dec 25, 2021 at 12:24
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    \$\begingroup\$ I’m voting to close this question because it may be a legal question, but is not about electronic design \$\endgroup\$ Dec 25, 2021 at 15:18

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Any layout tool I've used allows you to select colours, so you can avoid red/green for instance.

However your employer might have internal standards which would prevent you from making suitable choices, or other designers might have a 'standard' colour scheme that makes peer review of designs difficult if you go changing colours from what they are used to.

In many jurisdictions, the employer has to take steps to adapt the workplace to the employee. So, talk to your current or prospective employer.

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