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I have this set of PCBs. The top left board is always going to be broken away, but either the middle or the right one is there to stay. In order to save me a few millimeters and two whole 3-pin connectors on the large and one of the small boards, I thought to run a few tracks through the mousebites.

The bites themselves are 0.5 mm in diameter and the centers of the holes are 0.75 from each other. The standard track width I use is 0.25 mm but even 0.2 mm seems too big, especially with current track clearance distance.

Before I start narrowing down these settings and draw tracks between the bites, I would like to know if this is a good idea to begin with.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Board outline routing isn't the most precise thing in the world. You'll have to consult your PCB manufacturer. It really depends on how close traces may get to the edge of the PCB / to non-plated holes. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Jan 4, 2022 at 21:24
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    \$\begingroup\$ I've not done it myself, but I've seen people's panelized boards, where they did exactly that to be able to power up and test a whole panel worth of individual boards. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Jan 4, 2022 at 21:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ @MarcusMüller I have done exactly that when designing panels, to test them all at once. bask185, You might have better luck making one row of holes rather than two. Gives you a bit more freedom in terms of tolerances \$\endgroup\$
    – DerStrom8
    Commented Jan 5, 2022 at 1:33

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I've seen it done but with bigger holes so traces go thru without a problem. I 've seen it in Cypress Semiconductor prototype kits that have a built-in programmer that you can break off. Look at the picture here or at page 7 of this pdf. Sorry I could not copy/paste picture here.

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