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I am studying through Kirchoff's current law and following with a multimeter.

As per the law, I could see the current entering and exiting the node is same, 0.17mA. Also the voltage is 2.56 volts.

Voltage before node

Voltage before node

Voltage after the node

Voltage after node

When I measure the voltage at the node (series connection between the two parallel circuits,) it is zero.

Why is the voltage and current at the node zero?

Voltage at the node

Voltage at the node

Update:

The same thing happens when I measure this with voltage as well. Getting reading of 2.58V in nothe the places, but 0 at the node.

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    \$\begingroup\$ You're not measuring the current correctly. \$\endgroup\$
    – Hearth
    Jan 13 at 3:01
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    \$\begingroup\$ Current meter has to be in series with the branch that is being measured; what you have in the photos is putting the current meter in parallel with the branch you're trying to measure. \$\endgroup\$
    – MarkU
    Jan 13 at 3:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ The ends of the DMM leads are shorted when you're in current mode, so you're actually just shorting out those resistors. You get zero when you short out a wire since the wire already shorts itself out. \$\endgroup\$ Jan 13 at 3:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ Didn't find a good dupe on this site, but there is a decent tutorial on current measurement at learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/how-to-use-a-multimeter/… -- Note that the meter itself must be the only path that the current can flow through. Putting the probes across a component is correct for measuring voltage, but incorrect for measuring current. \$\endgroup\$
    – MarkU
    Jan 13 at 3:08
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Simsons It is "measure" and "measuring". Not "major" and "majoring". \$\endgroup\$
    – DKNguyen
    Jan 13 at 3:14
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From what I can see from your pictures, in the first two pictures you are measuring the voltage across resistors, and if you have a current through them then you surely get a voltage. But, in the last picture I can see that you are measuring voltage across a wire, and since a wire doesn't have a resistance (at least not in low frequencies) you won't read a voltage. We could help you better if provide your schematic.

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