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I have an electronic back massager that has a 12V input. Its adapter stopped working today morning, so I used a 19V laptop charger which connected to it perfectly and then I used it, but I'm second guessing whether that was a good idea.

My questions are as follows:

(1) Is it safe to use a 19V laptop adapter to power a 12V back massager or will it cause failure / fire etc. ?

(2) If I buy a 12V adapter and use it instead, is that safe?

(3) Can I use the back massager with a 12V adapter or does the fact that I have used a 19V adapter with it for some hours means that damage has already been done and I should stop using it altogether?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Extra information: The adapter is 19V AC, whereas the massager needs 12V DC. The adapter and the massager were connected for about 6 hours but it was only turned on for about 0.5-1 hour. \$\endgroup\$
    – Barn
    Jan 14 at 13:38
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    \$\begingroup\$ 1) Add the "Extra information" in the question by using the Edit function, not in a comment. 2) As we did not design the "12 V back massager" no one here has a clue what it will do when powered from 19 V. So you will not get a "That's perfectly safe!" answer here. It might work. For a (short) while. It might not catch fire, but there are no guarantees. You're on your own here. The only thing we can recommend is getting a replacement for the original power adapter as that is what the thing is designed for. \$\endgroup\$ Jan 14 at 13:40
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    \$\begingroup\$ How would we know what kind of voltages your device can work with, if we don't know anything about how the internal circuits are designed? \$\endgroup\$
    – Justme
    Jan 14 at 13:42
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    \$\begingroup\$ This querstion can't be answered with the information provided. We'd need to see the schematics of the device. But: Don't do it if you do not very well know what you're doing. It can be a fire hazard! A lot of electronics can take quite a bit of abuse for some time. But you never know if and for how long. So if unsure: Don't! \$\endgroup\$
    – kruemi
    Jan 14 at 13:47
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    \$\begingroup\$ "Extra information: The adapter is 19V AC, whereas the massager needs 12V DC. The adapter and the massager were connected for about 6 hours but it was only turned on for about 0.5-1 hour." God bless that engineer who over-designed the charging/supply circuit. \$\endgroup\$
    – Ron Beyer
    Jan 14 at 14:31