-1
\$\begingroup\$

I was given a problem-based learning assignment that told me to find and explain the *circuit that consists of 2 or more LM741 op-amps. Based on my research, I only managed to find a "three op-amp instrumentation amplifier." That's a circuit structure that can amplify the differential signal while stripping off any common-mode voltage. It clashes with other team's topic, though, so I'm here to ask if there is any other circuit type that fulfills the question criteria that I mentioned above.

I just need suggestions on the circuit type's name and will do the research on my own afterward.

\$\endgroup\$
7
  • \$\begingroup\$ There are basically endless possibilities. You could look into analog pulse-width modulation (pwm), just to mention one example. \$\endgroup\$ Jan 15 at 7:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ It's called an Instrumental amplifier or INA for short, that uses laser-trimmer resistors for almost ideal CMRR. 120 dB = 1e6/1 \$\endgroup\$ Jan 15 at 7:36
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ A Google image search for "dual op-amp circuits" gives plenty of results. You might also be interested in reasons-not-to-use-a-741-op-amp on this site. \$\endgroup\$
    – Transistor
    Jan 15 at 8:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ here one : electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/604113/… \$\endgroup\$
    – Antonio51
    Jan 15 at 8:14
  • \$\begingroup\$ "problem-based learning assignment" = question!!! \$\endgroup\$
    – Andy aka
    Jan 15 at 9:57
1
\$\begingroup\$

In response to the last question of your posting I can list some very versatile filter circuits.

Under B) you can find so-called "Biquadratic" or "universal filters), which - at the same time - can provide three basic filter functions: Lowpass, highpass, bandpass (bandstop).

A) Two-opamp topology:

GIC-Filters (Generalized Impedance Converter) - most versatile topologies,

B) Three-opamp topologies

  • KHN-Filter (Kerwin-Huelsman-Newcomb),
  • Tow-Thomas,
  • Fleischer-Tow,
  • Akerberg-Mossberg,
  • Berka-Herpy,
  • Parallel structures
\$\endgroup\$
0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.