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Inside a defunct garage door opener I found this IC:

33192C

I tried searching for 33192C with variations of 'datasheet' and such keywords, but I got routed to the usual datasheet farms who are happy to let me know that they don't have it, and oh, by the way, here's an ad!

Can anyone identify this part, and even better, link to a datasheet?

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    \$\begingroup\$ The M emblem is for Microchip. Do you have an idea when the garage door opener was made? \$\endgroup\$ – Nick Alexeev Mar 11 '13 at 0:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ I can't pin it down, but I know the remote was in active use within the last 15 years. \$\endgroup\$ – Don Wakefield Mar 11 '13 at 2:02
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    \$\begingroup\$ The date code suggests 2003, week 38. \$\endgroup\$ – Brian Drummond Mar 11 '13 at 9:26
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Looking through the Microchip KeeLoq "code hopping encoder designed for secure Remote Keyless Entry (RKE) systems" datasheets, I'm 99% sure that this is one of them, either rebranded for a customer, or a close custom version.

enter image description here

Look for the HCS3xx series. The Packaging Information for those chips show the top code use. 33192c would be the end user custom code.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Cool! I found datasheets online for the HSC301 and the HSC360. In a couple of weeks we'll put the circuit back on the oscilloscope and try to narrow it down! \$\endgroup\$ – Don Wakefield Mar 12 '13 at 2:17
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    \$\begingroup\$ @DonWakefield considering it might be a custom part (instead of just customer numbered), it might not act exactly same as you would expect from one of the datasheet standard parts. I still would assume the general idea/operation is there though. \$\endgroup\$ – Passerby Mar 12 '13 at 20:18
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That is a microchip logo. They bought a Israeli rolling code generator company for garage openers in the mid -90's. So that might help you. Called KeeLoq (I think)

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Yeah, rolling codes sounds familiar. When we had the board up on the oscilloscope, the pulse patterns changed every button press... \$\endgroup\$ – Don Wakefield Mar 11 '13 at 2:03
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Just a guess but I think the 001 3B2 is the HEXadecimal code the chip puts out. The receiver must be programmed to accept it. My remote has 001 386 and the neighbors is 001 00F. All HEX numbers.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Most modern garage door openers work on a rolling-code system, and the transmitter is used to program the receiver, not vice versa. \$\endgroup\$ – duskwuff Jun 20 '18 at 3:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ Mine is marked: 33192C 001 8JB M 0126 I think the first line is marked to represent a custom code, but the second line isn’t HEX, with a ‘J’. It would have to be nonadecimal in that case, I guess. ;) The last line has the M logo and the YYWW date code. \$\endgroup\$ – John K Jun 16 at 23:04

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