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This is probably stupid, but I have become very confused and would like someone's help.

I have brought some equipment from the usa, and these run on 110v. Where I live, I only have 220v. I brought an ac adapter, but became confused with something.

The adapter says "input 110v 50 Hz, output 220v 50w". My question is, is this a step up transformer or a step down transformer? Which is the input and which is the output on the adapter? Since my equipment runs on 110v, will plugging this adapter into a 220v outlet work, or is it the other way around?

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closed as off-topic by PeterJ, Daniel Grillo, Ricardo, JIm Dearden, brhans Jul 14 '15 at 16:47

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions on the use of electronic devices are off-topic as this site is intended specifically for questions on electronics design." – PeterJ, Daniel Grillo, Ricardo, JIm Dearden, brhans
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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It steps up. It was designed for the States, you should try to find an adapter that outputs the power you need at a 220V input.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ so basically, "220v input" is the wall outlet, not whatever you plug into the adaptor, right? \$\endgroup\$ – Malfunction Mar 14 '13 at 17:59
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Malfunction That's correct. In some cases, they [adapters] are purely step up transformers and you could end up feeding your device 440v :O. \$\endgroup\$ – MDMoore313 Mar 14 '13 at 18:11
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As a general rule, when the adater says input X volts that means that its input is X volts. In the case of your adapter, x=110, meaning you should not plug it into a European outlet, which is 220V. The adapter you bought is made for taking European equipment to the US, not the other way around. However, your USA equipment may already handle 220V: check the back to see the acceptable range of input voltages on your equipment, and if there is a 110/220V switch. If so, then you only need an adapter that will allow you to plug in the USA-style plug into a European outlet, without transforming the voltage.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Yeah, I was just confused with the "input" concept. I would like to accept this answer too, or at least up vote it, but I don't have enough rep. :( Thanks anyway! \$\endgroup\$ – Malfunction Mar 14 '13 at 18:22
  • \$\begingroup\$ Oh, I see: you were confused by whether the input means "input to the adapter" or "input to the equipment"? Gotcha! \$\endgroup\$ – angelatlarge Mar 14 '13 at 18:25

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