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A mathematical operator is generaly a mapping between a domain set of functions and a range set of functions.One example is the derivative operator L ( L[f] = f' ) for example.

Can i say every representation of a electronic/electrical system ( input-output representation, statespace representation, block diagram representation) can be generalized to be formed by mathematical operators. Can i generalize to say that every electronic/electrical system ( filter,ac/dc converter, amplifier,etc ) is simply an operator ?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ This question has nothing to do with electrical or electronic design and will probably be closed. You will receive a much better response over at the Mathematics Stack Exchange. \$\endgroup\$ – embedded.kyle Mar 15 '13 at 19:32
  • \$\begingroup\$ What ? It has to do because i'm talking about electrical and electronic systems, i'm a electronics engineering student, i'm just trying to link a bit of math with electronics systems.Why should i talk about this in math exchange rather than here? \$\endgroup\$ – nerdy Mar 15 '13 at 19:35
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    \$\begingroup\$ Sorry, that wasn't clear. Your edit has made it more engineering specific. And while our mods have mentioned being "greedy" for questions that could work on more than one site, I'm still going to recommend Math.SE to you. Their community is larger and more active. You're likely to get a better answer there. Just trying to help. \$\endgroup\$ – embedded.kyle Mar 15 '13 at 19:44
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    \$\begingroup\$ Sorry, I tuned out at "mathematical operator..." \$\endgroup\$ – Olin Lathrop Mar 15 '13 at 21:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ yes, but many such systems would be heavily dependant on initial conditions, even ideal ones. \$\endgroup\$ – geometrikal Mar 16 '13 at 1:34
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Well, yes*, in the same way that all computer programs can be represented as a function of their inputs and time. Hence simulators exist for most kinds of electronics that people build.

The (*) is there because you have to make a number of simplfying assumptions. Real world components have properties that are temperature dependant, and real systems always have a certain level of noise. Most of the time you can approximate this out, but sometimes it matters; you can build a pretty good random number generator by amplifying a noise source.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, i was considering ideal systems. \$\endgroup\$ – nerdy Mar 15 '13 at 20:30
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Well in that case, "Each and every Electrical & Electronic can be represented as a mathematical function mapped from the input domain to output domain in such a way where you define an operator on each system function". I hope this helps.

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