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I've been looking at getting some 3.5 mm audio jacks for a project I'm working on and these seem to be the best: http://www.switchcraft.com/productsummary.aspx?Parent=529 The problem I'm having is that I don't know which is better for my application. I'm looking at 35RASMT2BHNTRX which is a dual open jack v.s. 35RASMT4BHNTRX which is a dual closed jack. If I use the dual closed jack can I use those switches to detect that an audio cable is present?

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Unless you need to detect if a connector is plugged in (such as to select or connect something else like an internal speaker/mic instead) the difference is essentially irrelevant.

If you do need to do so, consider which will be most convenient for your circuit. You may find it clearer to look at the schematic symbols on the mechanical drawings than to try to interpet the written description.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks! I did look at the schematic but still didn't really know if it made much of a difference. I'm still new to all of this. If I have multiple audio inputs that are optional is it good practice to only enable to port if something is plugged in, or will I not get any additional interference with the open socket design? \$\endgroup\$ Mar 18, 2013 at 19:59
  • \$\begingroup\$ If they are wired in parallel, it's not clear how a switch in the jack would really change your exposure unless you expect people to be sticking conductive objects other than plugs into it. If each goes into its own mixer input though, the switch could inform your controller/software to mute that input, or simply ground the input. \$\endgroup\$ Mar 18, 2013 at 20:07
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As seen on The schematic option 12 and option 4 are the dual closed and dual open. Same exact thing, except the dual closed has two extra terminals that short to the tip and ring terminals when no plug is connected. Commonly used, the dual closed allows a passthrough only when no plug is connected.

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