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I am using a .step directive to see the performance of a Miller integrator with various bypass resistors in the feedback path. The code and produced waveform are given below. However, I can't seem to figure out which is which (obviously I know based on the fact that the lowest resistance has the highest 3dB frequency, but I'm hoping for a general method of having LTspice tell me which is which). Any help would be greatly appreciatedenter image description here

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  1. Right click the plot than View
  2. If you need to exclude some, Select Steps
  3. Finally, click Step Legend

Example:

enter image description here

enter image description here

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    \$\begingroup\$ Thanks for the response. I am on Mac, so I only see View>Steps (not Select Steps). Unfortunately my LTspice app crashes when I click Steps so I've not made it past there yet. \$\endgroup\$
    – EE18
    Apr 1, 2022 at 1:20
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    \$\begingroup\$ It sounds like a possible bug that you could report (I don't have Mac). You can also LClick on the trace's label to bring up the cursors and then use Up or Dn arrow keys to select the steps. It starts Dn with the 1st trace, going Up. Also, there's one other thing you could do: use custom colours for traces and remember them (e.g. resistor codes). Then, look at the label of the trace (here green). That means the first trace is green, and the next ones are those as you have defined them, in cyclic order. \$\endgroup\$ Apr 1, 2022 at 9:16
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    \$\begingroup\$ @aconcernedcitizen I've gone ahead and reported it. To your point though, it seems like the colours are in the opposite order of the list I gave them (in my example, the 100k resistor gets the green trace, which is the first colour in the list and first in the "Down" cycle). \$\endgroup\$
    – EE18
    Apr 1, 2022 at 14:30

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