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I want to wire this motor to a 3-pin plug. The colors are not standard. Which of these wires is neutral, active and earth.

It would be of interest to know what this kind of motor is called?

I was recently given this small electric motor (approximately 200mm long x 60mm diameter). The shaft is mounted stationary to a framework. The motor housing spins freely around the fixed shaft (c.f. pulley attached to housing). It has purple, brown and blue wires. I have never seen a motor that operates this way and haven't found description of or name of this type of motor. I’m trying to figure out what it is and how to wire it to make it work.

Edit: Australian colour codes would suggest that brown is active, blue is neutral, leaving purple as earth, but when I tried this combination, it threw the breaker switch.

description on motor housing

entire motor

pulley on housing

wiring

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Good background information, now, what is the question? \$\endgroup\$ Apr 5, 2022 at 9:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ I want to wire this motor to a 3-pin plug. The colours are not standard. Which of the wires is neutral, active, and earth? What is this kind of motor called? \$\endgroup\$ Apr 5, 2022 at 9:36
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    \$\begingroup\$ It may be that none of the wires are earth and the motor is expected to be earthed via its metal mounting frame. Whilst it's built inside-out, with the stator on the inside and the rotor on the outside, it otherwise seems to be a normal single-phase capacitor start induction motor, for which writing diagrams are available on the Internet. The sprung device in the final picture may be a centrifugal switch for capacitor start. Measure the resistance between all 3 pairs of wires. Operate the centrifugal switch manually and repeat the measurements. If you can't work out the wiring from that add... \$\endgroup\$
    – Graham Nye
    Apr 5, 2022 at 10:03
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    \$\begingroup\$ drum motor from a dryer? \$\endgroup\$ Apr 5, 2022 at 10:22
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    \$\begingroup\$ "I don't have a multimeter" If you're going to tinker with electrics I strongly suggest getting one and reading up on how to use one. Shopping recommendations are off-topic here but for safety working with mains voltages I'd avoid the bargain basement devices. For measuring mains current clampmeters also improve safety at extra cost. \$\endgroup\$
    – Graham Nye
    Apr 5, 2022 at 14:12

3 Answers 3

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As others said, the motor needs a 4uF run/start capacitor, and yes, you’ll have to exercise the centrifugal switch to make sure it works.

The grounding is done via the frame.

So you’ll need a standard power cord (eg Schuko to flying wires), then connect green-yellow to the metal frame, and blue+brown to the motor and capacitor. The capacitor connection depends on how the centrifugal switch is wired. And to figure that you’ll need a multimeter.

The motor is from an appliance like a washer or a dryer. It originally drove a V-belt – see the pulley at the end of the housing.

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There is no mystery in a fixed shaft, rotating body motor.

Ceiling fans are of similar design.

enter image description here

It's a single phase 220 V ~ 50 Hz, capacitor start / run motor.

Here's the schematic.

enter image description here

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Having a mobile shell and fixed core, it's an external rotor motor.

It's probably a three phase motor if AEG on the label is a brand-name

If the resistance between any pair of wire is the same as all others this is almost certainly true.

As a three phase motor, for single phase operation it can be connected as a capacitor run or capacitor start motor. It looks like a 4 uF capacitor is needed for this.

The exposed mechanism and the plastic cone may be the part of the switch mechanism for a start capacitor circuit.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Going by the name plate it's certainly a single phase motor. \$\endgroup\$
    – vu2nan
    Apr 5, 2022 at 10:53
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    \$\begingroup\$ A three-phase motor doesn't need a start/run capacitor. \$\endgroup\$
    – Graham Nye
    Apr 5, 2022 at 10:55
  • \$\begingroup\$ indeed, but it does need three phase, \$\endgroup\$ Apr 5, 2022 at 10:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ The centrifugal switch is very uncommon in three phase motors. Also 230 V line-line voltage basically only exists in Norway. \$\endgroup\$
    – winny
    Apr 5, 2022 at 10:59
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Jasen - Hi, Viewed that way, it's a 2-phase motor! \$\endgroup\$
    – vu2nan
    Apr 5, 2022 at 11:15

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