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As far as I know, potential difference (voltage), that's mean it needs two point to measure it.

Then what does vc or ve only or vb only?

If vce means potential between vc and ve? And what does ve only means or vc only means?

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3 Answers 3

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From this website: -

Double letters (cc) refer to power supply voltages. For example, Vee refers to the "emitter" voltage. In CMOS logic, Vss refers to the "source" voltage, and Vdd is the "drain" voltage.

Single letters refer to the voltage relative to ground; for example, Vc is the "collector" voltage relative to ground. Two different letters indicate the voltage between two terminals; for example: Vbe is the "base" to "emitter" voltage drop, while Vce is the "collector" to "emitter" voltage.

I mean, I could have used my own words but the website puts it succinctly.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ This is almost clear, one thing else i want ask is. "Vc is collector voltage relative to ground". Is it collector pin? Or load pin? Consider if transistor has load resistor through its collector \$\endgroup\$ Apr 13 at 22:54
  • \$\begingroup\$ Vc is at the collector. Vcc is the positive power feed to a circuit that uses transistors (BJTs) that have a collector. So, Vc for a common emitter amplifier will never quite reach Vcc unless the transistor (BJT) is biased off. \$\endgroup\$
    – Andy aka
    Apr 13 at 23:25
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When in doubt , Gnd is always the reference which by definition is always = 0V. (for a reasonable bandwidth) the suffix or subscript after V are:

CC = collector V+
EE = Emitter V-
DD= Drain for CMOS IC V+
SS= Source for CMOS IC V-

When given as Vbe, Vce or Vgs, Vds, it is assumed to be a differential voltage.

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It could depend on the context but generally Vce is Vc - Ve, Vc is Vc - 0 (referenced to 0V), and Ve is the same.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ How about vcc? Does it means potential difference between vc and vc? So if you calculate it vc-vc=0, and so vcc always zero \$\endgroup\$ Apr 13 at 21:08
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    \$\begingroup\$ It's a bit confusing, but Vcc, Vee, Vdd, and Vss have different meanings because they were shorthand notations in specific types of circuits: electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/17382/… Generally, they are for power rails. \$\endgroup\$
    – vir
    Apr 13 at 21:13
  • \$\begingroup\$ Okay so vcc is basically positive DC power suply, vee means zero voltage or ground. How about vbb? \$\endgroup\$ Apr 13 at 21:22
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    \$\begingroup\$ It's whichever voltage is supplying the part of the circuit that is connected to the base. I think that's pretty rare these days; I've just seen base biasing networks and the like referenced to Vcc. \$\endgroup\$
    – vir
    Apr 13 at 21:25

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