2
\$\begingroup\$

After failing trying to use my friends blow-torch to De-solder components from all these circuit boards and burning them badly and probably both of us getting lead poisoning and smelling the crap all day, I decided that I were to invest a bit of my money on de-soldering technology. I know Radio-Shack is a bit pricy, but I can bike to it and get free shipping therefore I don't want to get it online. I first heard about the de-soldering wick, but that runs out and I've heard it isn't the best. After a bit of internet surfing, two things popped up that seemed they may be suitable this and this.

The first one is a desoldering iron with a bulb. I would like to go for this because it is cheaper but I don't know if it will work very well (like it not sucking up any solder or me having to replace the bulb ALL of the time). It does look nice because of it's one-handed-ness but does it work? any experience with these? The second one was a de-soldering vacuum and it was a bit more pricy but may work better for my needs because of its spring-loaded pump.

So... Is the first one suitable for de-soldering a bunch of circuit boards, or should I get the vacuum?

Sorry if it is not "on topic"

\$\endgroup\$
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ What type of component are you trying to de-solder? through hole or surface mount?? Also what kind of packages?? For \$\endgroup\$ – Kvegaoro Mar 21 '13 at 21:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ manly through-hole \$\endgroup\$ – skyler Mar 21 '13 at 21:52
0
\$\begingroup\$

You could also potentially use ChipQuik. It's mainly for SMD components but I suppose it could be used for thru-hole components.

https://www.sparkfun.com/products/10925

\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

Neither is particularly useful for desoldering all the components from a board. Desoldering in general is not something easy to do in large amounts, but sort of a "here and there" type thing. Sometimes, an element of a board needs to be reworked, and tools like that can help, or maybe a hot air station would be more useful for your special case. There are also a variety of different devices that would supply you with vacuum, like this. Without knowing exactly what you're trying to do, and why, its tough to be more specific.

\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

I typically use a hot air gun. I bought this one sometime back and its great and cheap. The soldering gun, kinda sucks, but I bought it mainly because of the hot air, the iron was just an added bonus (even though I dont use it)

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/SMD-2in1-898D-Soldering-Rework-Station-Hot-Air-Gun-Solder-Iron-Welder-Parts-/121061748887?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_2&hash=item1c2fd7b097&_uhb=1#ht_2829wt_1139

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ does that solder station work for soldering also? I may buy that if I can do everything \$\endgroup\$ – skyler Mar 21 '13 at 21:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ yup :) I use it to solder and desolder stuff. The iron kinda sucks, but its probably good to learn. Comes with a bunch of different tips and stuff. \$\endgroup\$ – efox29 Mar 21 '13 at 22:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ and the "smd rework" desolders through-hole also? \$\endgroup\$ – skyler Mar 22 '13 at 0:18
  • \$\begingroup\$ it can i suppose, but you would need to add some low melting solder, then you can heat it up, and just remove it. Ive never actually done that, I normally just use an iron and some solder wick for that, but you can use a hot air gun for through hole as well. Just need a low melting solder \$\endgroup\$ – efox29 Mar 22 '13 at 3:54
0
\$\begingroup\$

The iron with bulb is very easy to use for through hole components. desolder wick is required for some smd stuff, but in general is hard to use, and easy to burn yourself on (heat moves through copper mighty fast).

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Smaller wick will work much better; the stuff radio shack carries is too large. Still, it's not the preferred tool for removing even a single entire IC. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Mar 21 '13 at 22:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ yeah more for cleaning a pad before re-soldering... I always have it around and rarely use it, and when I use it I rarely think "well that went well" \$\endgroup\$ – Grady Player Mar 21 '13 at 22:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ It's very hard to get all of the solder off with it for removing components when you can't heat all the leads at once and don't want to resort to the wire dragline trick, but it's a very good way to remove accidental solder bridges between tiny surface mount IC leads, or to level pads before replacing components as you mention. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Mar 21 '13 at 22:54
  • \$\begingroup\$ Could you elaborate on the "wire dragline trick" please? \$\endgroup\$ – pjc50 Mar 22 '13 at 10:03
0
\$\begingroup\$

What type of component are you trying to de-solder? through hole or surface mount?? Also what kind of packages?? For surface mount, I would not try any of the two approaches. For through hole components I would only try on axial 2 or 3 lead packages, otherwise It would be too time consuming. You should consider a hot air rework station, sparkfun.com has one for about $100 but its well worth it, I actually use that for my prototyping at my work place

\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

Back in the day when I found it useful to remove large numbers of through hole components from PC boards I devised a scheme to heat the whole board up to solder melt temperature. Components were then able to be lifted off with simple needle nose pliers.

Heating the boards was done on an old cook stove in a large sized "cake pan". The pan was partially filled with peanut oil to a level that covered over the board. Peanut oil supports being heated up to a temperture over the solder melt temperature of older style 60/40 tin-lead solder.

Certain cautions ARE REQUIRED if to use this technique.

A) Apply heat indirectly to the pan and do not use open flame to heat the pan.

B) Make sure to wear heavy leather gloves that go all the way up your lower arms. Hot oil splashes will instantly burn through your skin.

C) Make sure to wear a face shield as hot oil can splash up and hit you in the face without it.

D) Keep a fire extinguisher nearby that is designed for oil fires in case something gets out of control.

E) Do not do this in a living space unless you want your house to smell like a Chinese Restaurant kitchen for the next six months.

F) Lastly make really good and sure that you do not introduce water into the hot peanut oil at any time.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.