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Can this circuit charge a capacitor, or will it not work? To me, two diodes is enough for full wave bridge rectification if the cathode on the capacitor is grounded. I’m just trying to charge a capacitor by rectifying a secondary.

Schematic

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    \$\begingroup\$ What is your ground connected to? \$\endgroup\$
    – vir
    May 9 at 20:25
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    \$\begingroup\$ Interesting: the image seems to have been edited to remove the central tap (which would charge the capacitor). "Please tell me how to do it." Connect the central tap back to the same "GND" the capacitor is connected and complete the full wave rectifier. \$\endgroup\$
    – devnull
    May 9 at 20:30
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    \$\begingroup\$ The diodes block current in both directions. No it won't work \$\endgroup\$ May 9 at 20:32
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    \$\begingroup\$ Put a voltage source instead of the transformer and ask the same question. \$\endgroup\$
    – Eugene Sh.
    May 9 at 20:51
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    \$\begingroup\$ You already asked this question on Physics.SE here: physics.stackexchange.com/q/707659/22927 You're not going to get a different answer here. \$\endgroup\$
    – The Photon
    May 9 at 21:22

3 Answers 3

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Somebody removed the grounded center-tap: rectifiers

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A nail in the dirt is not a ground.

In any case, no grounding is required.

Here are three ways for you to charge the capacitor.

  1. Using a single diode.

enter image description here

  1. Using two diodes.

enter image description here

  1. Using four diodes.

enter image description here

It should be ensured that the component ratings are not exceeded.

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Sure the C T is the accepted way to go .Sure the 4 diode fullwave bridge will do this when a CT is not present .If you want to use just 2 diodes with no CT you could place 2 resistors to ground one on each transformer secondary terminal.This will waste power and limit charging current.If the resistors are too low the transformer will overload and possibly burn out .If the resistors are too high the charging time will at some point become too long .

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