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Looking at an ENTSOE paper, I have seen this table in which the typical ''loading factors'' of different generation types are listed (see figure below). But, what is this????

I was supposing that it is the ratio between the power that the generator usually produces in normal conditions over the nominal power of the generator. But, it looks strange to me, because if you look at the loading factors of Fossil base generators or hydro ones, it is between 0,5-0,7, but I know that these generators usually run at a value near to 100% of power because efficiency is much higher. I don't know if my sentence is correct.
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This is the link of the document if you want to give a look to it

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Context - including a link to the paper - would help. If I had to guess, I would guess that the time axis is relevant, and what they call "loading factor" is what is usually cal/led "load factor". This is measured over long timescales - like years - and includes downtimes like maintenance or even whole seasons (eg in northern climes, heat demand is low in summer) \$\endgroup\$ 2 days ago
  • \$\begingroup\$ @user_1818839 I added the link to the question :) Anyway, I don't think that the loading factor is what you mean, because it is used to calculate the system inertia in a particular time instant, so there is no time axis \$\endgroup\$ 2 days ago

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What they call "loading factor" seems to be what is usually called "load factor" (in the UK at least). This is measured over long timescales - like years - and includes downtimes like maintenance or even whole seasons (eg in northern climes, heat demand is low in summer)

See Eqn 5.6 (refers to Eqn 3.11) and see from first sentence of 5.2.3.1 that this is an ESTIMATION process.

My reading is they are using the Load Factor I described above, for any generator type, as a probability that a generator of that type is running at any given moment. This weights the inertia of one nuclear plant as more than twice that of an oil plant, in the overall estimate of inertia for the whole grid (because it is more than twice as likely to be running)

I haven't read the whole paper, but I'm guessing they will eventually lead up to the conclusion that it's pretty trivial for BESS to simulate almost any inertia required to stabilise the grid, as long as the required inertia can be calculated, and that retiring rotating plant and adding BESS should cause no problems - IF done in the right order.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ wait wait... To confirm your answer, I searched the ''load factor'' meaning on internet. This is not related to outage or reliability. This is a measure of the utilization rate of the generator and is the ratio between the average load and the peak load in a given time interval. Therefore, what I am supposing is that the Inertia of the system was weighted more for generator with low load factor because they run at low loading compared to their installed capacity!! Not something related to reliability as you said \$\endgroup\$ 2 days ago

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