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Had to ask this in electronics, would like to hear this from people who have been involved. I am not a native English speaker, and I couldn't find a definitive answer online: there are too many variants that looked odd to me. There probably should be a way engineers pronounce this word?

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    \$\begingroup\$ "Kilo-Ohm" is a international unit. I strongly assume, its pronunciation differs from locale to locale. So possibly migrate to the respective language stack exchange ?? \$\endgroup\$
    – tobalt
    May 21 at 11:44
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    \$\begingroup\$ As a fellow non-English speaker, where did you see this? It's the first time I've seen/heard it without the full "kiloohm" \$\endgroup\$
    – pipe
    May 21 at 15:08
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    \$\begingroup\$ My first question is if "kilohm" is even a word. But of course, that, too, might be regional. \$\endgroup\$
    – ilkkachu
    May 22 at 8:51
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    \$\begingroup\$ BTW, note that SI standard mandates the spelling of the prefixed units, but not the pronunciation. The correct spelling is "kiloohm", with two "o". See latest SI brochure. \$\endgroup\$ May 22 at 9:25
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    \$\begingroup\$ I don't think this is opinion-based. The pronunciation of terms is part of technical communication, which is completely on-topic, especially in multcultural environment (what if two engineers from different country spell a word differently and the communication fails during a critical operation?). The subject may be regional, country- or language-specific, but it's not opinion based (common practices are not opinions). Voting to reopen. \$\endgroup\$ May 23 at 9:24

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I'm a retired US electrical engineer who spent his time in defense electronics research at a fairly well-known defense laboratory associated with MIT. I've lived all my life in New England.

I've never heard anything other than KIL-om. Short i, long o. From your point of view, as if it is "kill ohm", with the accent on "kill". The accent is not strong, and is sometimes absent. Likewise one million ohms is "MEG ohm", with the e being pronounced as if it is a long a, as is done with the words "peg" and "leg".

Informally, among other electronicers, a kilohm would simply be called a "K". As in "ten k". For larger resistances, just "meg".

EDIT. As has been mentioned in comment, the Brits apparently pronounce both o's. So you should consider tailoring your pronunciation to whichever side of the ocean you expect to talk to.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Over 10 years in electronics and I've never heard the first "o" being dropped before. Where I'm from (UK) you pronounce both o's seperately "kilo-ohm" \$\endgroup\$
    – ChrisD91
    May 21 at 12:45
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    \$\begingroup\$ @ChrisD91 - I'm not all that surprised. That's why I specified my nationality/geographic area. Television has been a great leveler of accents, but it can't level what isn't said. And electronic component values just don't seem to get discussed much on popular shows. I wonder why that is? \$\endgroup\$ May 21 at 12:52
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    \$\begingroup\$ I'm not sure of the relevance of your MIT-associated defense lab experience except to brag or to prop up the authority of the answer - which does not fit with my experience either in the U.S. or in English-speaking Europe. I hear "kill-oh" (though as others commented, simply "kay" is more common). -1 \$\endgroup\$
    – TypeIA
    May 21 at 13:51
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    \$\begingroup\$ "kilo-ohm" is also in the US - that's the way I've said it for over 40 years. There are two "o"s... Western US. \$\endgroup\$
    – Steve
    May 21 at 20:30
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    \$\begingroup\$ UK engineer here, it's 'kill' 'ohm', or 'k', never heard anybody say 'kilo' 'ohm', however correct it might be thought to be. \$\endgroup\$
    – Neil_UK
    May 21 at 20:54
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9.3 Spelling unit names with prefixes

When the name of a unit containing a prefix is spelled out, no space or hyphen is used between the prefix and unit name (see Sec. 6.2.3).

Examples: milligram but not: milli-gram kilopascal but not: kilo-pascal.

Reference [6] points out that there are three cases in which the final vowel of an SI prefix is commonly omitted: megohm (not megaohm), kilohm (not kiloohm), and hectare (not hectoare). In all other cases in which the unit name begins with a vowel, both the final vowel of the prefix and the vowel of the unit name are retained and both are pronounced.

Source: Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI).

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So those who use resistors ask, as an example, for a 10-meg resistor as we all know the ohms bit.

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The second syllable of kilo, when used in kilohm, is a schwa - an indistinct vowel sound - it's pronounced like 'uh'. So we say 'ki-luh-ome'.

The classic example is 'elephant' - this is pronounced 'eh-luh-funt'. Nobody says 'eh-le-fant'.

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