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So I'm a big fan of building models and one issue we run into is managing to run and hide wiring through the model to power the LEDs.

Now I have read a little about inductive coil transfer and how it can be used to power LEDs but all I've run into is single coil and how it only powers within a certain area inside the coil I did a tiny bit of digging and found a simulator.

https://falstad.com/vector3dm/vector3dm.html?f=CurrentLoopField&d=streamlines&sl=none&st=20&ld=5&a1=40&rx=51&ry=-12&rz=-155&zm=1.659

This being what I found the magnetic field to be like with these coils but then playing around I found I could manage this.

https://falstad.com/vector3dm/vector3dm.html?f=CurrentLoopsStackedField&d=streamlines&sl=none&st=24&ld=5&a1=49&a2=21&a3=1&rx=14&ry=-23&rz=-78&zm=1.659

Which apparently creates like a focused magnetic tube of energy one going so far and being continued to be pulled by the second.

So I'm going to be straight at my current level the math is beyond me and the engineering is beyond me but is this sort of thing possible to create a cylinder shaped powered area as apposed to the single donut shape with limited internal area of powering.

I just want to know if my theory works before I really start to dig my head in and figure out the specifics of it all.

Thank you all for your consideration and assistance with this question and have a wonderful day.

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There are more complexities to inductive power coupling, but as far as coil design with respect to an active volume: indeed, you've stumbled upon the Helmholtz coil arrangement. With the correct ratio of radius and spacing, the field in the exact center can be maximally flat -- that is, for a small change in position, the field intensity changes as little as possible (|dB/dx| = 0). For other spacings, a wider volume can have intensity within some error bar; which would be the more practical case here.

Don't worry too much about "lines of flux"; that's a mathematical curiosity, and probably hurts more often than it helps. One gets the intuitive feel of a bundle of threads, but threads cannot intersect or twist [by an unlimited amount]; it's just a field, with magnitude and direction at each point.

https://falstad.com/vector3dm/vector3dm.html?f=CurrentLoopsStackedField&d=streamlines&sl=none&st=24&ld=5&a1=49&a2=21&a3=1&rx=14&ry=-23&rz=-78&zm=1.659

In particular, since the fields obey superposition, it's simply the result of two field patterns summed together. Notice the hump-like rise and fall of intensity along the axis of one loop; this is easier to see with the separation set high. Bring them closer, the intensity at say the midpoint is simply twice the value at that distance from a single loop. We can add two of these humps together in proximity, so they overlap, thus giving an extended range where the field strength is above some minimum value.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you very much for your answer I had it set to lines of flux more because it portrayed the magnetic pathing (a little) better then the particle movement view option on that simulator I didn't honestly know the difference of their scientific importance but thank you for that clarification. And thank you very much for clarifying that its the Helmholtz coil arrangement, that will give me a better direction of research since the term induction coils kind of goes all around especially in the direction of induction heating. I'll begin researching and more than likely return with questions. \$\endgroup\$ Jun 11, 2022 at 22:42

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