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I need to build an enclosure and for the electrical part. I want to put all electronics inside a small box. I want the enclosure as robust as possible for vibrations transport etc. Some part of electronics is boards as show below:

enter image description here

I have two questions:

  1. Regarding the above example where the micro's male headers will couple to another board's headers (red arrow and blue arrow.) The only thing comes to my mind is the jumpers below:

    enter image description here

    Is there a better or more reliable way for such wiring? I tried to find morpho to screw terminal but I couldn't find anything for this type of connection, or a way to solder

  2. Some of the boards I have are like the one on the right side and there are no holes so that I can fix them to the box by screwing them. Is there any way or tool to fix them in a way they are robust mechanically?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Those modules are designed for breadboard use, i.e. easy changes of wiring, not vibration resistance or reliability. You can use those female-female jumpers and add a dab of adhesive to the plastic junction for a little more robustness. Most robust solution is to design your own motherboard PCB, with holes for all the male header pins, then solder the modules in place. But forget about reusing the modules for anything else in that case. You could use header receptacles on your motherboard to allow module re-use, at the expense of increased thickness of the whole assembly. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Jun 15, 2022 at 19:04
  • \$\begingroup\$ You should have bought or designed boards that were meant to be stacked and physically fastened together. Google "PC104", or "PMC Cards" to get an idea of the way it should be done. \$\endgroup\$
    – SteveSh
    Commented Jun 15, 2022 at 19:37
  • \$\begingroup\$ And do you have a specification for your transportation environment? How much vibration (in g's) in each axis? Same thing for shock. Just saying "as robust as possible for vibrations transport etc" doesn't tell us anything. \$\endgroup\$
    – SteveSh
    Commented Jun 15, 2022 at 21:00

1 Answer 1

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Regarding the above example where the micro's male headers will couple to another board's headers (red arrow and blue arrow.) The only thing comes to my mind is [jumpers.] Is there a better or more reliable way for such wiring? I tried to find morpho to screw terminal but I couldn't find anything for this type of connection, or a way to solder.

Some of the boards I have are like the one on the right side and there are no holes so that I can fix them to the box by screwing them. Is there any way or tool to fix them in a way they are robust mechanically?

I'd suggest designing a PCB to adapt one to the other, then solder them together - that would be mechanically and electrically sound.

There are many PCB fabs out there today - OSHPark, JLCPCB, DigiKey Red, etc. Just have to draw a board and send them the files to have it produced at a reasonable cost.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Soldering is not mean for mechanical robustness between two assemblies. \$\endgroup\$
    – SteveSh
    Commented Jun 15, 2022 at 20:46
  • \$\begingroup\$ This is true, however if a PCB were made to adapt the above 80+ pin headers to the smaller board with 16 pins, do you really think there would be any mechanical issues? Could also add a drop of selastic/epoxy to secure the terminal edge of that little board. \$\endgroup\$
    – rdtsc
    Commented Jun 16, 2022 at 11:31

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