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How are modules with flat connectors typically connected? (If they have a special name, please tell me). Take a look at this buck converter:

enter image description here

When testing, I just used crocodile clamps. Now I want to go to "production" and something more permanent and at the same time modularity is needed. What is the industry standard? Up to 3 A will flow through the module.

The wire I had was too thick to go through the hole so I just put it in horizontally.

I had to switch from lead-free to leaded solder, because that silver stuff was terrible to work with.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Those aren't connectors; they're pads you're meant to solder a wire to. \$\endgroup\$
    – Hearth
    Jun 22 at 14:44
  • \$\begingroup\$ 3A for about 30 minutes then it goes into thermal shutdown, if you need 3A get the next size up. \$\endgroup\$
    – Jasen
    Jun 23 at 5:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ "What is the industry standard?" I don't think it's advisable to use soldering vias like this for production, the chance of mechanical stain on the wires is too big. Only use something like this if you got some means of strain relief. I would guess the only reason why they didn't provide proper connectors is because they are cheap. \$\endgroup\$
    – Lundin
    Jun 23 at 6:32
  • \$\begingroup\$ " because that silver stuff was terrible to work with" More likely the board is badly designed so that the minus signals sit right against the ground plane. Were all 4 holes as hard to work with or just 1-2 of them? \$\endgroup\$
    – Lundin
    Jun 23 at 6:34
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Lundin The main problem I had was solder not flowing and surrounding the wire. The wire I used was very likely too thick, and even if I pre tinned and scrubbed with the flux pen both the wire and the pad, I couldn't get the wire to immerse into solder completely. I was working at 390 degrees C. \$\endgroup\$
    – sanjihan
    Jun 23 at 6:48

2 Answers 2

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With soldered wires.

Strip a wire, insert in hole, solder.

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perhaps zinc plated roll pins could be used if you can't find pcb stake, or press-fit, pins in the right size (or in the right price).

zinc plated steel seems to solder well

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Would the hole size be repeatable enough on a cheap module like this to get reliable performance out of press-fit pins? I was of the impression that you had to have tighter tolerance on post-plating hole diameter for press-fit pins. \$\endgroup\$
    – Hearth
    Jun 23 at 5:53
  • \$\begingroup\$ use press fit pins on the board that this mounts to, \$\endgroup\$
    – Jasen
    Jun 23 at 6:59

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