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I have this high inrush relay (type G5RL-1A-E-HR.) Page 5 of the datasheet only mentions pin names from the bottom. The relay will switch on/off AC side of an SMPS.

There is no polarity mentioned for the input DC control voltage.

Can I wire the relay this way:

enter image description here

If I need to solder the AC wires to the pins of this relay, what would be the robust way to do it?

enter image description here

For the AC pins, I was planning to use this stripboard, but would that handle 230V with less than 1A RMS maybe with an SMPS inrush current of 10A?

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    \$\begingroup\$ That relay is intended to be soldered to a PCB. Unless you do a very good job of stain-relief, soldering wires directly to those pins is going to result in broken off pins in the near future. \$\endgroup\$
    – brhans
    Jul 4, 2022 at 11:25
  • \$\begingroup\$ I can solder AC side with this one. uk.rs-online.com/web/p/stripboards/1595420 The thickness and hole sizes ect given but not the current capacity. In my case AC side will be 1A rms 230V so I couldnt conclude \$\endgroup\$
    – ty_1917
    Jul 4, 2022 at 11:38

2 Answers 2

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The relay coils (except latch-type ones) are not polarised elements. So they can work with any polarity.

For soldering, you should consider mechanical stress and isolation as well. A stripboard "might" be suitable but if the wires are strong (thick?) and strained enough then they can strip off the copper. So you should take some precautions against an accidental short.

maybe with an SMPS inrush current of 10A?

Well, that's a very low inrush current.

PS: Personally, I'd switch both L and N to make the things "safer". Just saying.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you for the answer. When I apply 5VDC to control input, 6 and 5 closes and 3 and 4 closes. But since 3 is already connected to 6, and 4 is connected to 5; when I apply control voltage all those pins are connected to each other. So I didnt get why there are 4 pins at the AC side. What could be the reason or use for that?(I rechecked inrush is 45A) \$\endgroup\$
    – ty_1917
    Jul 4, 2022 at 11:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ @ty_1917 So I didnt get why there are 4 pins at the AC side. just to increase the current capacity. One contact may have lower current rating but shorting two will double it. \$\endgroup\$ Jul 4, 2022 at 12:13
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Do not hand solder wires directly on the pins on a relay intended for PCB mounting. Instead you should place this relay in some suitable socket that fits your application. For example there are DIN rail sockets with screw terminals which would be suitable like this one. There are lots of different manufacturers and flavours available.

Another reason for using sockets is that when it breaks, you can easily replace it by hand without soldering anything.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I would like to but which socket would work in my case docs.rs-online.com/d6a0/0900766b80dc0322.pdf ? I cannot find any for G5RL type. What parameters to be looked at? \$\endgroup\$
    – ty_1917
    Jul 5, 2022 at 8:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ @ty_1917 I'm hardly an expert on these various relay part numbers, G5RL appears to be an Omron-specific partno. TE/Schrack call them "RT series" but it's a standard with same physical dimensions and pinout for the relay. Omron no doubt have some very similar product, as do Phoenix and so on. \$\endgroup\$
    – Lundin
    Jul 5, 2022 at 10:09

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