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I want to understand 2 points in Ethernet Switch ICs.

In this IC - LAN9353, on page 34, the description in the table is mentioned.

"A low selects 1K bits (128 x 8) through 16K bits (2K x 8). A high selects 32K bits (4K x 8) through 512K bits (64K x 8)."

Does the above indicate the size of an external EEPROM or does it indicate the size of an internal EEPROM inside the LAN9353.

Second question:

In this IC - KSZ8863, It is mentioned in that the switch can be in managed mode and unmanaged mode. Can someone tell me the difference between the two modes? What is the meaning of managed mode and unmanaged mode.

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First question:
On page 8, under General Description the EEPROM is mentioned:

The LAN9353 contains an I 2 C master EEPROM controller for connection to an optional EEPROM.

The EEPROM is external.

Second question:
A Google search on "managed ethernet switch" turns up the Q&A:

What is a managed Ethernet switch?
A managed network switch is a technology that allows Ethernet devices to communicate with each other and that contains features to configure, manage and monitor traffic on a Local Area Network (LAN). A managed network switch provides more control over how data travels over the network and who can access it.

The configure, manage, and monitor features are the main thing indicated by the term "managed".

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you for the answer. When you say, managed ethernet switch, is it an option that should be enabled in the switch IC or some interface must be used in the IC? Please clarify \$\endgroup\$
    – user220456
    Jul 19, 2022 at 13:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Newbie the IC's documentation will be the source of information about what hardware or software it needs in order to support the managed mode. The question of whether it should be operated in managed mode or unmanaged mode depends on your use case. I.e., do you need the managed mode features? \$\endgroup\$
    – Sotto Voce
    Jul 19, 2022 at 17:29

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