0
\$\begingroup\$

I'm trying to design an automation for the status/current setting of my one electrical motor (1-6 variable settings) to drive a few behaviors to another motor or possibly two.

The electronic devices in this circuit are the driver (an exhaust fan) being set to 1 of 6 settings. A 24 or 120 volt motor (duct damper) that has a simple open or closed switch behavior that also can include an end switch to drive the last device if desired. The last is an AC motor which will have 3 power presets if possible (inline duct fan that needs to run on low, medium or high).

Driving device: This devices has 6 settings to drive the motor appropriately. A combination of downstream behaviors is needed based on the settings. A high-level electrical diagram for this device is attached. The 1-6 wires represent the 6 different settings.

  • Would AC/DC current sensor switches pick anything up on these 6 wires to use as a trigger? Would they only work on the neutral? How else could I identify for the automation that this device is set to a specific setting?

Downstream actions:

  • Driving device setting 1 and 2 = Open damper/trigger switch on first device

  • Driving device setting 3 = Open damper/trigger switch on first device + start second device on preset 1 low power setting (driven separately or using the end switch of the first downstream device)

  • Driving device setting 4 = Open damper/trigger switch on first device + start second device on preset 2 medium power setting (driven separately or using the end switch of the first downstream device)

  • Driving device setting 5 or 6 = Open damper/trigger switch on first device + start second device on preset 3 high power setting (driven separately or using the end switch of the first downstream device

  • How would you propose designing/building this circuit? AC current sensor switches, PWM controllers, statically set resistors for each preset (low, medium, high) etc.?

  • Would an Arduino provide any value here? Node-Red + Tasmota + Raspberry Pi? All that overkill?

  • Would you just bust open a 4 setting (Off, Low, Medium, High) variable fan controller and use that as a base for the build?

Actual devices involved listed below for reference!

  • ProLine Range Hood 750 + Diagram their support provided attached via image
  • 10" inline duct fan -- Would ideally find one that supports speeds 0-100%, but seeing most are 50-100%. All seem to be AC power.
  • A damper that just needs a switch open or closed in conjunction with the fan kicking on. Normally closed or normally open available.

Most the dampers I've considered offer end switch capability to trigger to connect the next device, so would it make sense to run through the damper to the fan? Does that screw up my multiple speed/preset needs? They also offer two voltages.

Appreciate any help provided!

enter image description here

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ Welcome! ”Would AC/DC current sensor switches pick anything up on these 6 wires to use as a trigger?” This would be a safe and least invasive solution. But costly compared to just making a Y-connection and sensing the voltage directly. \$\endgroup\$
    – winny
    Jul 22, 2022 at 21:19

1 Answer 1

0
\$\begingroup\$

It looks like the configuration of the drives to these fans and motors is determined by logic signals on the white header on the right side of the PCB. If so, that would probably be the best place to sense the various states and use that information to drive a similar second device. An Arduino or other simple microcontroller would seem to be appropriate for this.

Voltage sensors on the outputs would be more complicated, especially if there are different types of motors (24/120V or AC/DC). Also, if the various speed outputs connect to multiple speed windings, there may be voltage on all windings when operating.

A more detailed schematic is needed to provide further advice. Show the actual connections to the motors and their power sources, and also the device(s) connected to the control header.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.