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I don't even know where to start. I've done a cursory search/browse through Digi-Key and Mouser but haven't found anything similar. With words failing me I've drawn up a model of what it is I'm looking for.

In short: I need to design a new test station at work that can take Kelvin measurements and can handle high compliance voltages (around 3 kV).

The test posts are to hold the gold-plated leads of a UUT as it gets cycled through its operating temperatures, so ideally they would also be resistant to thermal changes. I know I've seen something similar before (I think at an antiques shop actually), but I can't for the life of me figure out what to search to find them.

Any leads or help in finding something similar is greatly appreciated.

enter image description here

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  • \$\begingroup\$ that looks like a modified clothes peg \$\endgroup\$
    – jsotola
    Aug 12, 2022 at 0:26

4 Answers 4

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  1. Get a 4-contact, dual-readout, card edge socket
  2. Shave off the plastic at the two ends, to allow insertion of a wire
  3. Install on a tall, insulated pedestal

Sullins EEM02DRUN

{Digikey}

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Kelvin test contacts:

http://www.coda-systems.co.uk/catalog/info_KWP150.html

Kelvin proble

{coda-systems}

Kelvin alligator clips test cables:

https://www.digikey.ee/en/products/detail/pomona-electronics/5940/737514

Kelvin alligator clip:

https://www.digikey.ee/en/products/detail/cal-test-electronics/CTM-78K/6111045

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Found almost exactly what I was looking for from Loranger. They appear to have quite a few different versions which should work well enough for my application. Thanks again to everyone who gave suggestionsenter image description here

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A somewhat simpler solution would be to use pogo pins in a 3D-printed "clamshell" that can be used to latch the UUT lead over a pair (or more!) of linearly arranged pogo pins.

The 3D-printer shell can be mounted to the chassis on ceramic standoffs, since FDM prints aren't exactly known for their low leakage. A resin print may be a better insulator, but you'd have to evaluate that.

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