7
\$\begingroup\$

I was planning on learn an HDL (preferably verilog as I have to take a course in it in subsequent semesters). My initial plan was to first learn the syntax and then implement all the digital systems I studied in my digital electronics course using HDL. But just out of curiosity, is there a book which would combine teaching computer architecture with HDL implementation? I think that would be much more fun.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ You should consider accepting some answers, it will be more conductive to getting better answers... \$\endgroup\$ – Thomas O Nov 7 '10 at 15:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Thomas, I accepted Mark's answer but I think Schedler's was also good. I selected mark because his book suggestions were more relevant to Verilog. \$\endgroup\$ – Rick_2047 Nov 10 '10 at 4:05
  • 5
    \$\begingroup\$ Verilog vs. VHDL is a religous issue. \$\endgroup\$ – Matt Young May 20 '14 at 17:44
4
\$\begingroup\$

My two recommendations, only read the later but I like the author so i'll plug the other one as well:

Computer Arithmetic and Verilog HDL Fundamentals

Digital Design and Verilog HDL Fundamentals

Digital Design and Verilog HDL Fundamentals is probably more what your looking for, the first is more focused on implementing mathematical operations. It may depend on what your after though, if your EE classes walk you through the entire design of a microprocessor as mine did you may find both useful eventually.

\$\endgroup\$
6
\$\begingroup\$

Peter Ashenden's "The Designer's Guide to VHDL" uses a DLX CPU design to illustrate many topics. However, if you're only interested in Verilog HDL then this might not be the book for you.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ +1: I code mostly in verilog, and used this book to get up to speed with VHDL when we had to integrate a bit of VHDL IP into our designs. IMHO, the book is organized well and it has good exercises at the end of each chapter. \$\endgroup\$ – Marty Nov 8 '10 at 15:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Marty, how did you learn verilog?courses or books? \$\endgroup\$ – Rick_2047 Nov 9 '10 at 10:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Rick_2047: Did a Doulous course, then picked it up on the job. Come to think of it, Doulous do have decent training stuff on their website: doulos.com/knowhow/verilog_designers_guide \$\endgroup\$ – Marty Nov 9 '10 at 16:04
1
\$\begingroup\$

There are tools available on android also to practice syntax errors. Just check out https://play.google.com/store/search?q=skand+vlsi

\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

I decided I wanted to learn how to work with FPGAs, so I bought a Xilinx Spartan-3A Starter Kit. Since I was new to this, and wasn't sure which flavor of HDL to learn, I got these two books:

FPGA Prototyping By Verilog Examples: Xilinx Spartan-3 Version

FPGA Prototyping by VHDL Examples: Xilinx Spartan-3 Version

both by the same author (Pong P. Chu).

Each book has dozens of examples that apply directly to various Spartan-3 based boards but can be applied to others. More importantly, the exact same examples are used in both books (as one would expect), so one can compare the complexity and readability of each one, Verilog vs VHDL.

\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

Coincidence or not, I just came across to this today: http://www.nandland.com

[moderator note: This answer had arrived here as a result of a merge.]

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.