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I have two new electric motors for a Valet Vacuum System. Unfortunately, the photos I took of the old motor setup (which was a few months ago) I have lost off my phone.

The new motors are slightly different in appearance from the original ones which burnt out.

I am unsure of how to rewire this back up again.

  1. My assumption is that it doesn't matter which of the black wires on the motor itself is used for neg and pos, as long as both motors spin in the same direction.

  2. I am confused about why the white little box (which I am assuming is a resistor) is on both motors. Is this a resistor? If so, why is it on the new motors but not the old? What is its purpose in this setup?

New 220v Motor img 1

New 220v Motor img2

Old 220v Motor

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  • \$\begingroup\$ the black wires do not have a polarity since they are connected to an AC power supply ... reversing them will not reverse the direction of spin \$\endgroup\$
    – jsotola
    Sep 12, 2022 at 6:12

2 Answers 2

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About your concerns:

My assumption is that it doesn't matter which of the black wires on the motor itself are used for neg and pos...so long as both motors spin the same direction?

Yes, it doesn’t matter, because the motor shown is a universal motor and is made in such a way that it can be powered either by DC or AC and it works on the same direction.
Furthermore, it does not care about polarity as +DC or -DC (or AC) as it rotates in the same direction. In case one wishes to reverse the spinning direction, the current orientation of the rotor & armature (connected by brushes) has to be reversed in relation to the field winding. See here and here.


I am confused about why the white little box (which I am assuming is a resistor) is on both motors. Is this a resistor?

No, it is not. It is a capacitor.

If so, why is it on the new motors but not the old? What is its purpose in this setup?

Brushed motors - DC or universal - generate electric (through the wire) and electromagnetic (‘wireless’j noise, because the armature windings are continuously switching by the brushes and commutator operation.
Original appliance installed the motor in a metallic enclosure, that works as a Faraday cage and contains/protect from electromagnetic irradiation. But the electric noise also travel through the wires. As it has high frequency components, a relatively small capacitor is used to “shunt” it, drastically reducing its propagation.
The purpose of this capacitor used it essentially to shunt/reduce noise propagation, avoiding interference on other electronic appliances.
For the motor itself, they are not necessary. Probably the original designer used another one further apart, or simply it was not considered relevant in the past - but is important now. Keep them!

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The white components are capacitors. The are connected directly across the motor so the appear to be for noise suppression.

Yes the black wires can be connected in either polarity. The motors will probably still turn the same direction, but it is good to check.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ So do i connect positive to one side of the black wires and the other is connected to negative? \$\endgroup\$
    – Adam
    Sep 12, 2022 at 8:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ i got it working guys...thanks for all your help. \$\endgroup\$
    – Adam
    Sep 24, 2022 at 1:51

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