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I have a Bosch refrigerator and some buttons have started to fail and I'm going crazy trying to find the push switch they used. I can't see any references and I have no idea what to look for. Any ideas on what type it is, or what it's called?

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I think the following models could do the trick, SKHHQVA010, SKHHQWA010 and SKHHQYA010.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ You don't give dimensions, which would be helpful. There's a similar-looking part here: us.misumi-ec.com/vona2/detail/110400372810 except the pushbutton height may be different. It looks like there are several height options though. \$\endgroup\$
    – John D
    Oct 20, 2022 at 19:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ Note it is common for big manufacturers to use totally custom parts. Like the display shown above, likely custom-made. Note there is some symbol or lettering on the bottom of the switch - that could be the manufacturer and series. \$\endgroup\$
    – rdtsc
    Oct 20, 2022 at 20:45

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Pushbuttons dont usually need to be replaced with an identical model. In your case, I beleive you may be able to use any grounded or non grounded pushbutton.

The critical dimensions are the plunger height above the PCB (from the included photos, about 7mm), and the PCB pitch (lead to lead distance for the 4 main ones, and the optional ground pin). Many of the electronic products you have around may have a similar push button for you to salvage. If the stem is longer than needed, trim it. If shorter, add some tape or glue a thin substance onto it. You can easily have this board up and running within an 10 minutes.

Note that I call the ground pin optional, but it does serve a function of reducing noise slightly, and ESD protection. However, I think it isnt strictly necessary in this application.

Bonus info: the buttons might not need to be replaced. Switches have metal inside them, which corrodes with time. This is why any switch with a datasheet will tell you about the minimum load (read more here, in the microload section). Any load bigger than specified (so, a larger current), would be sufficient to keep the switch operational. However, some designers ignore this. I am unsure about this, but I think if you pass a small current, for example turning on a 20 mA LED, you may be able to break down the oxide layer and allow the button to work a while longer. (If you know more about this, please comment and correct me. Thank you)

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It looks like a standard 6mm tactile switch with grounding pin. There are plenty of legitimate places (Digikey, Mouser, Arrow, Newark, etc; i.e. not Amazon, eBay, Aliexpress) to purchase them for pennies. Just be sure to measure carefully as the height is the critical dimension.

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