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Does anyone have difficulty interpreting Diodes Incorporated datasheets? I have been looking over a couple of their products and it seems like some information is missing. A specific example is the DPS1035 load switch. There is indication of a VREG pin connected to an internal regulator but... there is no specific mention of what value it supposedly outputs (or inputs), it just lists a range of -0.3 to 6V. It seems like there should be a listed value for this, otherwise I am just assuming... that the output is 5V? I am trying to figure out if I can enable the output by feeding the VREG to the EN but seeing that the type is listed as both I/O, it makes me want to avoid relying on it.

The datasheet is here, am I just missing something? I have noticed other chips of their seems to have ambiguous information, like a power controller having a 3.3V and 5V port that supposedly are LDO outputs but the datasheet lists maximum input voltages to that pin and a block diagram lists a 5V and 1.8V LDO, not a 3.3V. In comparison to datasheets from Texas Instruments or Analog Devices, which I personally find to be pretty understandable, these DI datasheets seem to do the bare minimum.

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For what you want to do, you don't actually need to know the Vreg voltage. All you need is the logical HI level for the EN pin which is listed as Venh, and the maximum allowable Ven, combined with the knowledge that it is, in fact, a linear regulator and that the IC is designed to operate from a minimum of 4.5V.

Since it is a linear regulator, it can only step down voltage and since the minimum input for the IC voltage is 4.5V then whatever voltage the linear regulator output must be less than 4.5V. Since the maximum allowable voltage on EN is 5V, it will suffer no damage from being connected to the VREG pin. And since , the minimum logic HI threshold for the EN pin is 1.4V that means it will work the way you want (it's unlikely an IC such as this would produce an internal voltage less than 3.3V, and even if it it did the next step down is 1.8V. You only see 1.2V and less in more advanced microcontrollers.)

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  • \$\begingroup\$ This is some superb logic, I totally follow and agree this seems like how it is set up. Thanks! \$\endgroup\$
    – jakob
    Commented Oct 23, 2022 at 1:53

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