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I am trying to figure out a good approach for controlling a solid-state relay (P/N D1D40).

Is it possible to just use a 5 V signal from a signal generator to turn on the solid-state relay? The datasheet says the minimum input current required is 10 mA which I would think a signal generator can provide.

If the above solution is not possible, do I need to build something like this where a separate power supply is used and the signal generator feeds a transistor to complete the circuit?

enter image description here

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3 Answers 3

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The SSD is an optotriac with some current stabilizator for LED inside. Control signal is the voltage, so if your signal inside those parameter, it will work.

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Unless your signal generator is a really cheap off-brand, yes it'll work. You can find this out by experiment, if you have the right equipment. 10mA at 5V works out to 500 ohms -- connect your signal generator to a 470 ohm resistor (that's a bit more than 10mA), put a square wave into it, and see if it hits 5V. If it does -- you know it'll work.

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Connecting it directly to a signal generator will work just fine.

Your solid-state relay has a current-limited control input, meaning that it'll draw around 10 to 15 mA independent of the input voltage, as long as it's higher than 3.5 V, as detailed in the datasheet that you linked. Any voltage source that can deliver at least 3.5 V at 15 mA will be able to drive this solid-state relay. A (good) signal generator's output impedance is low (50 Ω or lower), which means that it'll have no problem delivering the LED current for your SSR.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Could you elaborate? \$\endgroup\$
    – Voltage Spike
    Commented Oct 30, 2022 at 17:56

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