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I'm wondering if it's safe to put an energized circuit in a static shielding bag...as part of a high altitude balloon project.

I'm not too sure how these work, so I tried seeing if either the outside or inside of the bag was conductive on a regular multimeter, which I found that it was not.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ What was the goal in doing so? \$\endgroup\$ – Technophile Oct 16 '18 at 1:40
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I wouldn't put a high voltage spark generator in it but most other stuff will be OK - circuits won't break or burn-out because the resistance of the static bag is higher than a regular multimeter would read. Having said that some may be lower than a couple of Mohm.

This link might prove to be insiteful: -

Do antistatic bags have conductive interior, exterior or both?

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Yes they do have conductive interiors and exteriors. However the surface of the bag has may mega-ohms of resistance per inch. If you would like a comparason, an antistatic bag is very similar to an anti-static mat.

If you have high voltage or extremely sensitive components/analog circuitry you may run into problems. Another problem that the normal user shouldn't have, but could be an issue, is if you are working on a board that has traces extremely close together.

One other note, is that if you seal the bag, it can act like a faraday cage, and prevent/inhibit radio signals from entering or exiting the bag.

Alternatively instead of putting the circuit inside of an antistatic bag, a better way may be to create a large ground plane on the circuit, and then use some TVS diodes like these to protect any important components.

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While they might by slightly conductive, all you need to do is insulate your circuit, from the bag. Don't let any metal/conductive part touch the bag and you would be fine, for normal, non-high voltage circuits.

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In working with folks in the military packaging industry, yes, static shielding bags do have conductive interiors and exteriors. Also, keep in mind there are 2 types of static shielding bags and one might be more suited for your purpose:

Metal In Static Shielding Bags Metal-In static shielding bags offer superior durability at a low cost. Enhanced durability is obtained with the metallized layer buried between the polyester and the polyethylene layers of the metal-in shielding. The metal-in layer prevents the penetration of damaging electrostatic fields. Tribocharging is minimized by specially processed, non-static-generating polyethylene. This type of bag is recommended when packaging static sensitive components.

Metal Out Static Shielding Bags Metal-Out static shielding bags are designed to protect against static-induced damage. The Metal-Out layer is close to the surface for low surface resistivity readings. The Metal-Out static shielding bags will dissipate a 5,000-volt static charge to zero in less than 100 microseconds.

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