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I found several of this type of connector in an estate, and just wondering if anyone knows if this type of connector has a particular name, or what they are typically used for.

The writing says "141C, PATD IN USA JUNE 30 1914", but a quick search on that model number didn't return anything.

The plugs are 0.25 inch in diameter.

enter image description here

Picture of back. It's a 1/4" socket, threaded.

enter image description here

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Cool, what’s the connector on the back? 1/4” socket? \$\endgroup\$
    – Bryan
    Jan 15, 2023 at 22:23
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    \$\begingroup\$ Yes, 1/4" socket. will add a pic \$\endgroup\$ Jan 15, 2023 at 22:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ "... in an estate." What does that mean? It looks like an old telephone exchange part. Would it be for jumping two adjacent or vertically aligned sockets together? \$\endgroup\$
    – Transistor
    Jan 15, 2023 at 22:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Transistor from my uncle's estate, he collected vintage parts but none of them were labeled. he took a lot of old junk equipment apart so a telephone exchange system sounds plausible. thx \$\endgroup\$ Jan 15, 2023 at 22:43
  • \$\begingroup\$ FWIW, looks like a headset plug (telephone or radio): microphone and earpiece. \$\endgroup\$
    – david
    Jan 15, 2023 at 22:58

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Best guess: looks like a double plug for a telephone exchange operator’s headset and microphone, like the ones here.

Also see Wikipedia here, describing some early Western Electric plugs:

Code No. 103 twin 2-conductor plugs for use with type 91, and type 99 jacks—used for the operator's head telephone and chest transmitter (microphone)

Code No. 112, twin 2-conductor plug for use with jacks 91 and 99—used for the operator's head telephone and chest, with a transmitter cutout key (microphone mute)

Picture from Wikipedia, from the same article, of a "310 connector":

enter image description here

A two-pin version, known to the telecom industry as a "310 connector", consists of two 1⁄4-inch phone plugs at a centre spacing of 5⁄8 inch (16 mm). The socket versions of these can be used with normal phone plugs provided the plug bodies are not too large, but the plug version will only mate with two sockets at 5⁄8 inches centre spacing, or with line sockets, again with sufficiently small bodies. These connectors are still used today in telephone company central offices on "DSX" patch panels for DS1 circuits.

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    \$\begingroup\$ that is definitely it! looks like what they describe in the wikipedia article as a "310 connector". thanks! \$\endgroup\$ Jan 15, 2023 at 22:54
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    \$\begingroup\$ Had a look for 1914 June 30 patents, the only thing I saw was a cord reel for telephone operators. 1011164 \$\endgroup\$
    – david
    Jan 15, 2023 at 23:45

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