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For a Eagle CAD PCB board design, I am trying to use through-hole capacitors and resistors

I am using C050-035X075 package type capacitors from Eagle CAD library and 0207/10 for Resistors.

Are these the standard through hole resistors and capacitors? or am I doing something terribly wrong.

The capacitors are mainly decoupling 0.1 uF capacitors

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What do you mean by 'standard'? Resistors with different power ratings have different standard sizes (for example, 1/8W vs 1/4W). Likewise for capacitors, the part you need to use depends on the type of capacitor (monolithic, ceramic, electrolytic, etc) and the capacitance and voltage ratings. Assuming you are looking at the RCL library, 0207/10 simply means the body of the resistor is 2mm x 7mm and the hole to hole spacing is 10mm. Similarly C050-035x075 means 5mm hole spacing, 3.5mm x 7.5mm outline. You have to figure out (with calipers, for example) if this will work with the parts you are planning to use.

One thing you can do is print the board layout at 1:1 scale on paper before sending it out to the fab to see if the parts fit. You can catch common errors this way.

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I don't use Eagle, so I don't know what those packages look like.

You have to select packages that suit the components you intend to use, and how you want to mount those components (Most people mount through-hole resistors flat on the board, but some like to stand them on end - different footprints are required for the two mounting methods.)

If you can't find a footprint that suits your parts, make one! If you do any amount of PC design, you will have to make some of your own footprints with any CAD package.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I am mounting them flat on the board. \$\endgroup\$ – Ender Wiggins Apr 10 '13 at 3:56
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The rcl library has footprints for a bunch of common TH and SM resistors, capacitors, and inductors. I think both your capacitor and resistor are in that library.

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