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I'm trying to fix the check button lights on the side of a IDX V-mount battery. The LED lights won't light when the button is pressed. I stumbled upon a white "H2" component that I measured as open circuit and it was supposed to be closed.

I can't ID the component. Please help.

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    \$\begingroup\$ That's gonna be a fuse. A blown fuse. I don't know the rating, different manufacturers use different codes. Curious how you determined it's 'supposed to be closed' without knowing what it is. \$\endgroup\$
    – GodJihyo
    Jan 20, 2023 at 22:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ how did you determine that it is open circuit? \$\endgroup\$
    – jsotola
    Jan 21, 2023 at 1:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ I've tested the continuity with a multimeter and compared the reading with a healthy battery. It's a shot in the dark without removing the components I know, but I wanted see any irregularities. \$\endgroup\$
    – Miro
    Jan 21, 2023 at 7:40

2 Answers 2

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Looking at the component color and silkscreen text "FR1", it seems like a resettable fuse. I doesn't blow up mostly. When a current higher than trip current, it turns into high-resistance state, that is non-conducting mode.

If the high current was caused by one-time event, e.g. wrong wiring during experiment, it will get back to normal state after some time. However, for your case, it seems like there are other broken components that caused the overcurrent through the fuse. If so, need to fix it before awaiting fuse recovery or replacing fuse.

If the fuse is really broken, you will need to replace it. For resettable fuses, not only trip current but voltage rating are important. For example, common voltage ratings used in digital circuits are 5V or 9V. If your circuit is 12V or 24V circuits, you cannot replace with such low rating fuses.

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I think it's a fuse (one-time type) as available from Littelfuse and others.

However H is the code usually used for a 1A fuse and 2 is perhaps associated with 2A so it's hard to be sure what to replace it with. Also, there's a decent chance something else is fried in order to take out the fuse.

If you don't get a better answer and feel like gambling you would replace it with a 1A fuse of similar size and see what happens.

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