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My school is throwing away some old PCs which are all nearly identical. They happily allowed me to get my hands on a couple of parts including the ATX power supply below. As I see from the spec sticker on the side (picture below), they have a maximum power of 10 amps at 12 volts which makes for 120W

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My goal is to power an old 200W (4x50W, so at least 17A at 12V) car stereo so obviously this supply alone isn't going to work on higher volumes. This is a low-budget project more in the form of an experiment so I don't want to spend a lot of money to buy a suitable power supply.

I know that by connecting two of these in parallel, they are going to fight each other and eventually be destroyed because of small voltage differences.

Can I use capacitors to stabilize the output voltage of each supply so that doesn't happen? (And if yes how to find the right capacitance?)

Or maybe I can use diodes to stop the PSUs from fighting entirely. I think there are diodes with tiny voltage loss but I don't remember what they're called. (If they're expensive, I won't buy them but I still want to know)

Is there another way that I can't think of?

Last but not least, will ground loop problems occur in any of these solutions? The stereo has high quality sound and I wouldn't want to ruin it because of a nasty ground loop. I have a ground loop isolator which looks like this but I'm not sure it could help in that case:

enter image description here

This is not the exact one but it looks a lot like this. I am curious whether it could help in case of a such ground loop problem

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Basically you can’t. You need power supplies made for the purpose and/with ORing. \$\endgroup\$
    – winny
    Jan 21, 2023 at 11:10
  • \$\begingroup\$ On a low budget, there is no way to parallel two power supplies to get double the current. There is no specs of the radio but unlikely that you will need the amount of power you think you need for low budget speakers. You will need a complex circuit to OR the power supplies. \$\endgroup\$
    – Justme
    Jan 21, 2023 at 11:11
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    \$\begingroup\$ Also, try with your 120 W one first. Unless you play dubstep at clipping level, you’ll be fine. \$\endgroup\$
    – winny
    Jan 21, 2023 at 11:20
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    \$\begingroup\$ @greybeard I know that connecting them in seriues is dangerous, the question says "parallel" \$\endgroup\$ Jan 21, 2023 at 14:46

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