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I have a 5 V, 60 A power supply powering a few LED "blocks". I have these blocks powered in parallel, which is why I'm confused when I measure the voltage across each block. The further away the block (relative to the other blocks) from the power supply, the lower the voltage. The voltage drop isn't negligible either; it's preventing me from adding another LED "block", since the voltage dips below the threshold required to power the LED controller (an ESP8266, 3.3 V).

Each block consists of the LED controller and a strip of LEDs wired in series. I don't think the layout of each block is consequential to the issue at hand, so I omitted these details from the sketch.

Since these blocks are wired in parallel, shouldn't the voltages measured across each block be equivalent? Why would the voltage across blocks further away (R2 & R3 in sketch) measure lower than the closest blocks (R1)?

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

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    \$\begingroup\$ What current does each LED block require, and what is the size and length of the wires? \$\endgroup\$ Commented Feb 16, 2023 at 6:38

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The voltage drop is due to the resistance introduced by wires. The type of wires and their section and the distance (wire length) are the factors that affect the wire resistance.

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