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Recently I found an old ACER 6312-TA keyboard that I want to repair. Everything seems to work fine except for this component that I can't identify:

unidentified component enter image description here

I bet the reason this keyboard is not working has something to do with this part, since the other components seem to be working fine. I don't really know how to repair it without knowing what it is or what its purpose is. Any hint is appreciated.

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    \$\begingroup\$ That isn't a good enough picture to identify the part. \$\endgroup\$
    – Voltage Spike
    Mar 1, 2023 at 18:40
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    \$\begingroup\$ That's no component, in the traditional sense. Isn't that just a metal spring to ground the metal chassis? How are you sure other components are OK and the metal grounding spring is at fault and makes the whole keyboard to not work? \$\endgroup\$
    – Justme
    Mar 1, 2023 at 18:44
  • \$\begingroup\$ What Voltage Spike said. Could you post a better photo? At first glance it looks like a (deformed) spring that connects ground to another part of the assembly. Does it touch anything when the keyboard is assembled? \$\endgroup\$
    – ocrdu
    Mar 1, 2023 at 18:46
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Justme I checked the circuit path matrix (i guess that is how it is called) with a multimeter and all the electric paths connect fine to the processing unit. Also the cable and PC connections are intact \$\endgroup\$ Mar 1, 2023 at 19:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ The 2nd photo is blurry. It looks like a grounding point. \$\endgroup\$
    – Voltage Spike
    Mar 1, 2023 at 19:25

2 Answers 2

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It looks like a grounding point. (what I assume) to be the PCB ground (because it's the largest copper pour on the board, connects to it. It's probably a grounding point.

Also it connects to the black point on the cable, which I also assume to be ground.

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There is a power plug beneath thus ground contact used for EMI reduction.

Look for micro-annular breaks on every solder joint and any sign of life with a meter.

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