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I want to use a passive device to apply a 1V and 1MHz signal in a transmission line, While I am sweeping the frequency from 300kHz to 6GHz by Vector Network Analyzer (VNA) in that transmission line too.

I am new in RF field, and I tried the bias tee built in the VNA. But it filters the signal from the signal generator, and only it can pass 1v and 50kHz signals to the transmission line.

I am wondering which one of Diplexer or resistive power dividers is suitable for this job.

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Have you noticed that 300 kHz is less than 1 MHz? If you are sure that you want a bottom measurement frequency to be 300 kHz, then that rules out a diplexer, leaving you only with a wideband device like a resistive power divider.

An alternative is to split the measurement into two bands, say DC-F resistive, and F to 6 GHz diplexing, where F is some convenient intermediate frequency like 10 MHz or 100 MHz that makes both devices easier to buy or build.

Using a resistive power divider will of course put a series resistance in the way of your DC bias. This may or may not matter depending on whether you need to supply much current.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ @Ferrofluid- Hi, I have deleted your comment, as it was a duplicate of the new question you have asked. (a) You cannot ask new questions in comments. (b) You are effectively duplicating your separate question. Instead, you can add a link to your other question and invite the author of this answer if they can respond to that separate question. That avoids your duplication of the question here in a comment. || As I mentioned on your 3rd variation of the question, it causes problems when you start spreading out across multiple overlapping questions. Please avoid doing that. Thanks. \$\endgroup\$
    – SamGibson
    Mar 10, 2023 at 21:48

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