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I'm using this device - USB2514B

Table 3-3 says that the required resistor value is: "47 - 100 kohm". I assumed that the 47 was 47 ohms and not 47 kohms. I used 10 kohm resistors in my designs. Everything seemed to work OK. Now I have some boards that do not work consistently. I replaced the 10 kohm resistors with 100 kohm and the board works. Does the 47 really mean 47 kohm?

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    \$\begingroup\$ If the "k" doesn't apply to both numbers, then neither should the "ohm". Have you tried a resistor of 47 cm, or maybe 47 °C? Or just 47 resistors? ;) \$\endgroup\$ Mar 16, 2023 at 17:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ @IlmariKaronen, that's a nice way to put it \$\endgroup\$
    – user220456
    Mar 16, 2023 at 17:45
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    \$\begingroup\$ Sometimes understanding spec sheets requires decoding ambiguous language. English majors don't write this stuff. \$\endgroup\$
    – John Doty
    Mar 16, 2023 at 17:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ Obviously 47-100 = -53 kohm \$\endgroup\$
    – pipe
    Mar 16, 2023 at 21:00

1 Answer 1

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I would read that as [47 to 100] Kohm. Since the unit is only mentioned once, it should apply to both numbers.

Also, looking at the material after Table 3-3, resistor values are shown as "R K Ohm"

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    \$\begingroup\$ Looking at the same table, a spread of 47 Ohms to 100 kOhms strikes one as unreasonably large for an LED circuit. \$\endgroup\$ Mar 16, 2023 at 14:53

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