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I got my MOSFET gate driver TLP250 but it turns out it is a low-side driver.

I want to know if can I use it as a high-side driver and if yes, how it should it be done? I mean, of course, there will be differences between configurations, right?

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You can, but it'll be impractical.

Because you need your supply to be referenced to MOSFET's source i.e. negative terminal to be tied to MOSFET's source.

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

This technically means to use a floating supply (BAT1 in the schematic above) which doesn't seem to be available in your application. Bootstrapping might be a solution but it requires extra switch and therefore complexity. This will turn the driver into a bridge, and makes the TLP.. thing completely useless since you'll require a different driver. Plus, it does not allow you keep the MOSFET on indefinitely. So a floating supply is a must.

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I got my MOSFET gate driver TLP250 but it turns out it is a low-side driver.

Incorrect; the TLP250 can be a low-side or, a high-side driver. If used as a low-side driver it would naturally interface to an N-channel MOSFET. If used as a high-side driver it would naturally interface to a P-channel MOSFET: -

enter image description here

At a push you can use it as a high-side driver with an N-channel MOSFET; I've done similar things using SiC MOSFETs because they don't come in P-channel versions.

You would need an isolated supply such as those provided by Murata and Recom to make this work of course but, you'd probably use an isolated supply of the same type when interfacing with a P-channel high-side MOSFET.

So, given that Recom and Murata have designed foot-print compatible isolated DC-to-DC converters for use as high-side drivers it seems that they are practical and needed in industry.

I can vouch for that of course.

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