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I am working with DRV8210DRLR motor driver, mouser says it is a half bridge controller, texas instruments that it is a H-bridge. I require to spin motor and be able to change direction, so I assume I need full bridge controller. So first question is are there difference between H and Half bridges? Or are there 3 types of motor controllers: H bridge, half bridge and full bridge? Second question is about the interface, I use DRL package, I am trying to control the direction and speed of a BDC motor using this table on page 14: enter image description here

But it's a bit confusing, how to control speed and direction only using 2 pins? Or does my package is only able to spin motor in one direction, which would make this table useless and kind of misleading. I will include link to a datasheet here: https://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/drv8210.pdf?HQS=dis-mous-null-mousermode-dsf-pf-null-wwe&ts=1682497944275&ref_url=https%253A%252F%252Feu.mouser.com%252F

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Welcome! Full bridge = H-bridge. Please look up schematic for both half and full bridge and compare. If you want to complicate things even further, there are two sub-types of half-bridges as well, symmetrical with two capacitors forming a midpoint (common) and asymmetrical with just a capacitor in series to block DC (uncommon except for resonant LLC). \$\endgroup\$
    – winny
    Apr 26, 2023 at 9:52
  • \$\begingroup\$ Hello, I see, thankyou, so I would require full (H) bridge to control motor direction. But the second question still remains, how to control speed and direction of a motor using DRV8210DRLR driver, because i couldn't find anywhere on datasheet explaining that. \$\endgroup\$
    – Dominykas
    Apr 26, 2023 at 9:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ That depends on which mode you select, PWM Control Mode (DSG: MODE = 0) or PH/EN Control Mode (DSG: MODE = 1). In both modes, speed is controlled by PWM. \$\endgroup\$
    – winny
    Apr 26, 2023 at 10:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ my package, DRL only has one mode, PWM, and two control pins, IN1 IN2, I don't understand how to control direction and speed using these pins. \$\endgroup\$
    – Dominykas
    Apr 26, 2023 at 10:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ Normally you keep the high side MOSFET to static 1 and PWM the low side. \$\endgroup\$
    – winny
    Apr 26, 2023 at 10:31

1 Answer 1

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So first question is are there difference between H and Half bridges? Or are there 3 types of motor controllers: H bridge, half bridge and full bridge?

  • A H-bridge is also known as a full-bridge
  • A H-bridge is made from two half-bridges

The mouser site refers to half-bridges because the DRV8210 contains two half-bridges that can be (a) used independently, (b) used in parallel or (c) used together to form a "full" H-bridge.

how to control speed and direction only using 2 pins?

I've highlighted in your table where forward and reverse control takes place: -

enter image description here

The two input pins are IN1 and IN2 and you wire your motor in a H-bridge configuration: -

enter image description here

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  • \$\begingroup\$ but how does connecting 1 on IN1 and 0 on IN2 (motor spinning in forward direction) would provide speed for the motor? Or does 1 refers to PWM signal, this way, connecting PWM on IN1 would spin motor in forward direction and with PWM duty cycle speed would be controlled IN2 would have to be 0, and when IN2 connected with PWM and IN1 with 0 would spin in reversed direction? I am confused with these 1 and 0 definition in this datasheet. \$\endgroup\$
    – Dominykas
    Apr 26, 2023 at 10:44
  • \$\begingroup\$ Set IN2 to zero and drive PWM on IN1. The motor moves forward with the average voltage across the motor being determined by the duty cycle of the PWM. Mode pin needs to be low. @Dominykas \$\endgroup\$
    – Andy aka
    Apr 26, 2023 at 11:27
  • \$\begingroup\$ thank you, this makes sense. \$\endgroup\$
    – Dominykas
    May 2, 2023 at 8:39

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