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I have an electronic component which has no letter or number on it. It has 2 legs and when you shake it there is something moving inside up and down. I am searching for it for hour still have no clue. Here is the photo I've just taken:

enter image description here

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    \$\begingroup\$ A size reference in the photo or just telling us the dimensions would help. \$\endgroup\$ – Olin Lathrop Apr 26 '13 at 14:25
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It's a tilt switch.
It has a ball in it which breaks a contact when it rolls away or moves away from contacts.
Try measuring the resistance with it in various orientations

The image below is copied from here

enter image description here

This page says about one similar:

  • Tiny tilt switch type BT411-2 has a built in rolling ball (instead of mercury) so it doesn’t have the environmental health hazards that mercury tilt switches have.

  • These and similar types are used in vibration car alarms, sneakers that blink, toys, etc.

enter image description here


Many here


Re your link:

Strøm: 2mA maks.
Størrelse: housing Ø5.2 × 14mm (leads + 15mm)
Maks. temperature: 100°C
non-active contact: 10 Mohm
active contact: +/- 5 ohm

2 mA current rating.
10 megohm open circuit
5 Ohms operated.
5.2 mm dia x 14mm long with 15mm leads.
Maximum temperature 100 C.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ thnx i guess it is \$\endgroup\$ – user16307 Apr 26 '13 at 14:37
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Looks like a crystal oscillator , probably the 32.768Khz. Where did you get it from ?

https://www.sparkfun.com/products/540

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    \$\begingroup\$ I think this is incorrect because crystals don't rattle when you shake them. Also, it looks like one wire is connected to the can, which would be very unusual for a 2-pin crystal. In any case, a 2-pin device isn't going to be a oscillator. At best is would be a bare crystal. I think Russell is on the right track, so -1 for this answer and +1 for his. \$\endgroup\$ – Olin Lathrop Apr 26 '13 at 14:23

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