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I have 220 VAC 26amp dust collector that I need to run off a generator for my mobile business. The manufacture of the dust collector says to put it on a 40 amp circuit. When I hook the dust collector up to my 30 amp 9,000 starting watt generator it starts but slowly; once it starts the dust collector runs flawlessly. If I hook the dust collector to my homes 40 amp circuit then it starts right away. Due to this I bought a 50 amp 15,000 starting watt generator. When I connect the dust collector to the 50 amp circuit, the 50 amp circuit trips immediately. What is going on here?

The dust collector has a three wire (black, white, and green). I connected the dust collector to the generators 50 amp circuit with a four wire plug (black to black, white to red, and green to green).

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    \$\begingroup\$ The 50A circuit probably has a fast breaker. Your 30A motor probably takes 60A to start. \$\endgroup\$
    – user338146
    Jul 9, 2023 at 0:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ @ronsimpson how could it require 60 amp if it started on 30 and 40 amp circuits? \$\endgroup\$ Jul 9, 2023 at 0:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ I am concerned with your using a 4-pin plug on the generator. Often these are setup for the 220VAC output from the generator. \$\endgroup\$ Jul 9, 2023 at 0:29
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    \$\begingroup\$ There are various types of circuit breakers with different levels of capability to allow high surge currents above their nominal trip rating specifically for permitting things like motor loads to start up. \$\endgroup\$ Jul 9, 2023 at 0:32
  • \$\begingroup\$ Your post is missing information. In USA phase voltage 110V, but linear voltage for residential 220V. Home circuit 220V must have two pole breaker. But output voltage of generator is not clear. Make the picture of generator tag. And four wire plug has only 3 connection? \$\endgroup\$
    – user263983
    Jul 9, 2023 at 1:38

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The dust collector has a three wire (black, white, and green). I connected the dust collector to the generators 50 amp circuit with a four wire plug (black to black, white to red, and green to green).

Check the 4-wire plug from the generator (G).

In North America, the split phase is colour coded:

  1. Black is Phase A hot
  2. Red is phase B hot
  3. White is neutral
  4. Green is ground.

The voltage from Black to Red is likely 220V

The voltage from Black to White is likely 110V

The voltage from Red to White is likely 110V but phase shifted 180 dgrees.

So the dust collector (DC) connected from Black to Red received 220V instead of 110V, thus tripping the breaker.

The correct connection should be either:

  1. (DC) Black to (G) Black, and (DC) White to (G) White
  2. OR (DC) Black to (G) Red, and (DC) White to (G) White

Green to Green (Ground).

Check with a local Electrician to be safe

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