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I will be powering a 12V cctv camera.Is it okay to run the cable through a conduit with 220V AC? Or will it have an interference?

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    \$\begingroup\$ It has been a long time and I don't want to re-read it right now, but article 725 of the NEC code addresses things like this, I believe. I think it is not okay. There may be exceptions for MC since it is treated as its own conduit. But I'm not sure about that. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Jul 30, 2023 at 0:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ Running 12V pretty supply for any significant length of cabling sounds like a design mistake, to be honest! \$\endgroup\$ Commented Jul 30, 2023 at 1:14
  • \$\begingroup\$ @MarcusMüller I see no mention about significant lengths. If the conduit is just for getting through a wall, half a meter at most, the situation is quite different from pulling 20m of conduit. I do wonder where they'll be pulling the signal from the camera to and whether that will be anywhere near this conduit. \$\endgroup\$
    – Mast
    Commented Jul 30, 2023 at 9:30

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Usually it's easier to keep the 12V power separate from the 220V. the rules for Separated Extra Low Voltage (SELV) are much more lenient the the rules for 220V (which are the rules you'll need to follow if you put the camera wires inside the 220V conduit.

It can be done, but this requires that the camera has reinforced or double insulation and that the power supply and 12V wiring also has this on the DC side. also no other wiring to the camera. the DC circuit is then no-longer a SELV circuit. The video must be wireless or fibre-optic.

If the video signal does not need a conductor (ie it's wireless or fibre instead instead of co-ax or CAT. ) it may make sense to put the 220 to 12V transformer closer to the camera and use the 220V inside the conduit as the power source.

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It is electrical code violation. Low voltage and high voltage should run separately. If you conduit can be divided, it could be done.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Although it's probably a code violation, it's possible for it not to be if the camera and its power supply are double-insulated and it communicates over WiFi or fiber. \$\endgroup\$
    – brhans
    Commented Jul 30, 2023 at 2:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ The double-insulated doesn't buy you a thing in NEC. They don't want AC mains power crossing over on low voltage wires whose insulation and enclosures are not rated for it. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Jul 31, 2023 at 0:07

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