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I use 2.2mm FASTON-like connectors (top of first image) to connect to the male terminals of the illuminated switch on the left, but they are a pain to connect and sometimes even damage the male terminal.

I found a terminal that is way easier to attach (bottom of first image with blue wire attached) which has a small sheet inside it that acts like a spring and a dent on top to fix the male terminal in place, but I cannot find the name of that terminal. What is the name?

Follow-up: Is there a recommended female terminal type for the male terminals?

Male and female terminals, FASTON and ???

The bottom terminal was harvested from a socket that is sold with the buttons (see image 2). But there don't seem to be any sockets for the 12 mm illuminated switches, only the quick connects (also see image 2).

sockets and terminals

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    \$\begingroup\$ Are you sure that those are not solder tags? \$\endgroup\$ Aug 13, 2023 at 13:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ @AndrewMorton At least it is not advertised as solder tags. (I updated the question with additional info) \$\endgroup\$
    – clash
    Aug 13, 2023 at 20:12
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    \$\begingroup\$ @DavideAndrea No, not really. The question also contains a female terminal with a spring-mechanism, but its name is not discussed. \$\endgroup\$
    – clash
    Aug 13, 2023 at 20:25

4 Answers 4

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The connectors that you mention are known as Lucar connectors.

Here's a view of an automotive oil pressure switch with a male Lucar connector.

enter image description here

Image credit: AliExpress

The following is a magnified view of the mating female connector.

enter image description here

Image credit: Ebay

The bump in this connector is seated in the hole in the male to secure the electrical connection.

Oblong slits, in the male terminals of the component in your photograph, indicate that they are wire solder tags and not Lucar connectors.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ That is the type of the terminal that I currently use. The terminal in question (with the blue wire attached) is not of that type. \$\endgroup\$
    – clash
    Aug 14, 2023 at 21:08
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to the male terminals

Those are solder eyelets. They are not intended for removable female connectors. They are only intended for soldering a wire to it. That's the only reliable way to connect to them. Sure, you can jury rig a female terminal to them, but it will soon slip off.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ At least the seller advertises sockets alongside the button that contain the terminal crimp on the bottom of the first image. And they actually fit pretty good. The advantage over the quick-connects is that they are easier to attach while at the same time need a lot of force to detach. \$\endgroup\$
    – clash
    Aug 13, 2023 at 20:22
  • \$\begingroup\$ That is a "switch", not a "button". Specifically, it's a momentary push-button switch. It may be that your switch has short tabs only suitable for soldering. The switch sockets you show may be for switches with longer terminals. \$\endgroup\$ Aug 13, 2023 at 22:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ There are both momentary and latching variants. If it shall be soldered, that is probably pretty hard to do without damaging the plastic. Anyway, there is a spring on that female terminal in question. It is obviously not a quick disconnect. But what it is remains a mystery. \$\endgroup\$
    – clash
    Aug 14, 2023 at 20:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ "But what it is remains a mystery." It's not a mystery to us: it's a solder eyelet. \$\endgroup\$ Aug 14, 2023 at 20:55
  • \$\begingroup\$ The question is about the female terminal that contains a spring (with the blue wire attached). Not the male terminal, not the FASTON-like terminal. \$\endgroup\$
    – clash
    Aug 14, 2023 at 21:00
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"terminal was harvested from a socket"

This probably means there is no any special standard name separate from the socket. It is simply a part of the whole unit, most likely manufactured specifically for these sockets.

Now, whether you can use any standard terminal for the same purpose is entirely different question.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ True. Fore some reason the sockets only exist for the 16mm and 19mm diameter switches. For 12mm, there are none. But it is hard to imagine that there is no appropriate female part. The male counterpart does not look esoteric at all. \$\endgroup\$
    – clash
    Aug 14, 2023 at 21:50
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I found a terminal that is way easier to attach (bottom of first image with blue wire attached) which has a small sheet inside it that acts like a spring and a dent on top to fix the male terminal in place, but I cannot find the name of that terminal. What is the name?

TE part number 60577-1 is a quick-connect female disconnect with a dimple that snaps in the hole in a quick-connect tab.

TE part number 175411-1 is a quick-connect female disconnect with a latch and a dimple that snaps in the hole in a quick-connect tab. To remove it, you must lift the latch.

TE part number 63391-2 is a quick-connect female disconnect with a spring leaf in the back that squeezes a 2.2 mm quick-connect tab.

Again, sorry for not answering your direct question before. I hope you feel that this time I did answer your direct question.

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