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This is an 8-pin connector from a home generator and I need to re-attach a wire that was pulled out. The other side (pins) are attached to a control panel with fitting so I don't think I can replace the whole connector.

I've been buying some different connectors, not sure I'm buying the right ones, but most are either too small and I cant crimp on the wire, or too big and I can't get back in the connector.

I need to get the 16 AWG wire back in the connector, the clip is quite small.

I believe it's a MOLEX JR? But I am unsure what to buy/look for?

I also believe this is the male end? Someone suggested this may be the part.

enter image description here

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    \$\begingroup\$ In many cases a basic crimp with needle nose pliers that will hold the wire, followed by careful soldering and then crimping the strain relief tabs over the insulation will give a reliable connection. In practice this is not done due to the speed required in mass production. Make sure the crimped area is small enough to fit in to the back of the connector housing. \$\endgroup\$
    – KalleMP
    Aug 28, 2023 at 6:27

2 Answers 2

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That is a Molex Mini-fit JR female plug. It's a female because it uses sockets: holes = female.

The tin-plated crimp socket contact for 16 AWG wire is a Molex 0039000077.

You can buy it here: https://www.digikey.com/en/products/detail/molex/0039000077/1643440

Molex 0039000077

{Digikey}

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    \$\begingroup\$ THANK YOU! I am looking at this and the crimping tool shows at $757 dollars for 16AWG?! Is there another way to do this? Doesnt make sense to buy an $800 crimping tool or even a $100 tool! \$\endgroup\$
    – canadianeh
    Aug 27, 2023 at 12:50
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    \$\begingroup\$ @canadianeh - Does it make sense? Depends on how much you want your car (I assume that's a car) to operate with that connection fixed. If you don't want to spend the money up front, take it to a mechanic and let him deal with it. If you really feel like taking your chances, you can bend those ears around a wire with pliers. Then you'd need to get crafty with the pliers to shape the joint so it will fit into the connector easily. I've actually done this, and it worked, but I'd never want to do it with something I'd want to depend on. \$\endgroup\$ Aug 27, 2023 at 17:04
  • \$\begingroup\$ I ordered a tool that claims to be able to crimp this properly. Not a $757 dollar crimp however \$\endgroup\$
    – canadianeh
    Aug 28, 2023 at 0:46
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    \$\begingroup\$ @canadianeh It's not unusual to see crimping tools with a $1000 price tag, and 3rd-party tools sold for $100 or less (which often work okay for occasional use, but not always). The expensive one costs that much because it's the factory original (or factory-recognized) tool. Quality of the end result is only guaranteed by the connector vendor when the factory original tool is used, use anything else and you lose your (legal or technical) warranty. It's why they can be sold at a massive price - In a production environment where you're making parts by the 1000s, $1000 is negligible. \$\endgroup\$ Aug 28, 2023 at 7:05
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    \$\begingroup\$ Just wanted to say thanks again here. This was the exact part I was looking for. I was able to buy a cheap set of crimpers off Amazon, that said they could do disconnection. I did what was said and practiced about 30 connections before trying to make the real one on some spare wire. This was key. I was able to make the connection and everything seems to be working now. Thank you again. This was a big part of the puzzle for me to solve what exactly I needed to buy here. \$\endgroup\$
    – canadianeh
    Aug 31, 2023 at 19:07
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There are many low-cost "non-insulated" wire crimpers. There must be youtube videos on how to use them properly (many people don't).

The crimp terminals are cheap. Get some extras and some extra wire and practice on a few. The professional tools will give a repeatable, reliable, and optimal result. But with a little practice you can get a good result with the cheaper tools.

There are also pin removal tools for getting the broken contact out of the connector shell. Fortunately they are not expensive. There will be one specifically for this connector/terminal.

But... with care they can be removed without the tool. You have to study the drawings for the wire terminal and connector shell and it will become clear to you.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you! Whoever did work on the machine pulled the other wire out and there's no connector bit inside. I think I found a crimp tool that will work. Good advice on practicing! I need to practice some soldering too! \$\endgroup\$
    – canadianeh
    Aug 27, 2023 at 13:28

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