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I am trying to add this: enter image description here

potentiometer to my design. As you can see, it also has two pins in order to support it structurally. This is the datasheet if anyone is interested: https://www.tme.eu/Document/fb277d87df6cd625a5906cf03c82b793/ALPS_RK09K.PDF

enter image description here

My first question is if it possible to find such a footprint in Kicad's vast footprint collection. I recently updated to version 7, and the footprints bundled are much-much more than in version 5.

If there is no readily footprint available, it is unclear how I should create this footprint, considering that two pins are just for mechanical support and they are not connected anywhere....

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2 Answers 2

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This device exists as Potentiometer_Alps_RK09K_Single_Vertical in the Potentiometer THT library of Kicad 7, and says it supports these parts: 113004U 1130A6S 11300DR 1130A8G 1130081 1130A5R 1130AP5 1130AST D1130C3W D1130C1B D1130C3C D1130C2P

Even when you find the exact part in the library, you may find it worth creating your own. Many designers like to keep a library of the parts for a given project, to insulate it from upstream library changes. In any case, always check it carefully against the datasheet to ensure it suits your purposes.

enter image description here

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My first question is if it possible to find such a footprint in Kicad's vast footprint collection. I recently updated to version 7, and the footprints bundled are much-much more than in version 5.

Look in the library list for the "Potentiometer THT" (THT stands for through-hole technology) library. You might need to activate the "filter by library" button in the footprint mapping dialog if you still see a lot of non-potentiometer footprints.

If there is no readily footprint available, it is unclear how I should create this footprint, considering that two pins are just for mechanical support and they are not connected anywhere....

Just go ahead, and create it :) There's really no magic there: add a contact with an oval hole, and a pad shape that's rectangular with rounded corners, of the appropriate dimensions; duplicate it, giving the two contacts the same designator, to make it so that they are inherently connected. That's it, really.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ It's not a bad idea to connect that shell to ground while you're at it. \$\endgroup\$
    – TimWescott
    Sep 15, 2023 at 22:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ @TimWescott but you'd ideally do that where you insert the symbol to the schematic, because only there you'd have a notion of what ground is. \$\endgroup\$ Sep 16, 2023 at 3:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, I was just giving the "what", not the "how". I'd make a symbol that shows the two connection points, and connect them to the appropriate net in the schematic. \$\endgroup\$
    – TimWescott
    Sep 16, 2023 at 21:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ Absolutely! Not criticizing the what :) just adding a comment on the how! \$\endgroup\$ Sep 17, 2023 at 5:31

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