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TLDR: do any dual-role USB-C port controller ICs support USB-PD 3.1 to allow 240W charging?

I am designing a power management module for an ebike which will utilize bidirectional USB-C Power Delivery. I am planning on using the Texas Instruments BQ25756 buck-boost controller to handle voltage and current regulation from / to a variety of sources. The BQ25756 will interface with a power MUX for VAC ("input" side) switching and will be controlled by a microcontroller (ESP32 or STM32).

Interface between the ebike and external devices using a proprietary connector (wall chargers, powered accessories, etc.) will be handled by the microcontroller, but I have yet to find any control solution for USB-C Power Delivery which allows for dual-role operation above 100W. The BQ25756 datasheet mentions a USB-C port controller (Texas Instruments TPS26750) which is capable of managing dual-role power delivery up to the maximum output permitted by USB-PD 3.1, 240W.

That said, Texas Instruments seems to have no record of this port controller IC existing, only its USB-PD 3.0 (100W) sibling, the TPS25750. Numerous other USB-PD 3.0 port controllers exist, both as standalone ICs and integrated into microcontrollers, but the only USB-PD 3.1 port controllers I have been able to find are single-role and intended for specific applications such as AC-DC wall chargers or experimental firmware patches for the TPS25750 which do not support the full voltage range of USB-PD 3.1.

USB-PD 3.1 has been around for a couple years now and numerous companies are selling laptop chargers on the consumer market which supposedly support the protocol. Is there a dual-role port controller on the market which I have yet to identify, or is this protocol still new enough that most implementations are using proprietary port controllers? If the Texas Instruments TPS26750 is in development, have any statements surrounding its expected release date been made?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Extended ePD (48V) is in early stage of development. You are on your own at the moment. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Oct 5, 2023 at 3:18

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BQ25756 is a fairly new hip. 48v ePD is new in ic offerings even though it is included in the USB-PD 3.1.

With 48v becoming the automotive bus for next gen cars, we will get more solutions but for now as of Oct/2023 you have to design the logic yourself.

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