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I have ribbon cable which uses a staggered male IDC connector, which plugs into a corresponding staggered female PCB mount connector.

The following image shows the cable plugged in to the PCB connector.

Photo of cable and connector

The female connector is Wurth 690367180872 which looks like this:

Image of female connector

Image sourced from manufacturers website

I want to solder it on a stripboard. But the pins on the PCB connector are on a staggered grid as can be seen from the datasheet:

Staggered grid pinout

I have a couple of questions about this connector. Firstly, why are the pins staggered? Secondly, is it possible to solder this connector on to stripboard?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thats a cable mount connector to make cable. I already have the cable male IDC cable. I need a Female “PCB Mount” socket. I already have it. My question is being straggred a problem for soldering to stripboard. \$\endgroup\$
    – GNZ
    Sep 21, 2023 at 19:19
  • \$\begingroup\$ I've updated the question for you to hopefully clarify based on the comments you have posted. If there any inaccuracies in my edit, feel free to correct them. \$\endgroup\$ Sep 21, 2023 at 19:43

4 Answers 4

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The staggering potentially gives easier signal routing on a custom PCB (not stripboard), but it also makes the mechanicals of the connector internals easier.

For prototyping use they can often be made to fit normal stripboard with a bit of "persuasion".

However, the default socket for 0.05" IDC cable is a dual row 0.1" connector which is a trivial fit for stripboard. I would suggest you use such a socket instead.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ But it says Pcb mount in the link in my question. See the link for actual part. Can it be solders to a veroboard or stripboard? I wonder why are they straggered if it says PCB mount. Super confused and cannot find same part with straight pins. Frustrated \$\endgroup\$
    – GNZ
    Sep 21, 2023 at 18:05
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    \$\begingroup\$ Most PCBs aren't stripboard, and staggered pins both makes the connector internals easier, and routing of customer PCBs easier. On the other hand, there are lots of similar connectors which have dual row 0.1" pins which are a trivial fit of stripboard. This is a link to one example gbr.grandado.com/products/… which you could use instead. \$\endgroup\$
    – colintd
    Sep 21, 2023 at 18:19
  • \$\begingroup\$ The one you recommend is for making cable. Thats cable mount. I have that. I have ribbon idc male cable and need to connect one end to pcb. So I need a “PCB mount” female socket exactly as in my link. Only thing I don’t understand why they are stsggered. Im not sure I could explain my question still \$\endgroup\$
    – GNZ
    Sep 21, 2023 at 18:46
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As stated in the other answers, there is nothing about the term "PCB Mount" that indicates a particular arrangement of the pins on any given grid. The term simply means the connector can be soldered to a PCB assuming the appropriate footprint is used.

The staggered footprint simply lines up the pins with the individual wires in the ribbon cable which are on a 1.27mm pitch. Doing this is a choice the manufacturer made in order to make a more compact connector.

The more common 2.54mm pitch regular grid connectors are physically larger in order to accommodate additional metal elements in order to map the splice terminals onto a grid.

You have three options available to you, depending on whether this is a prototype or a more permanent setup.

  1. For a simple one-off prototype, you can most likely just bend the legs of the socket to match the strip board. Using a pair of plyers, gently kink one row 0.635mm one way, and the other row 0.635mm in the opposite way to line them up on grid. You should be able to then push the connector into the strip board and solder it in place.

  2. For a permanent setup, you could consider designing a PCB (they are cheap to produce now-a-days) rather than using strip board. On the PCB use the correct staggered connector.

  3. As an alternative, consider if possible replacing the connector altogether. You can simply cut off the existing connector, and attach a new IDC connector which uses a stripboard friendly rectangular grid such as those shown in @Davide's answer. The PCB mount mating connector for those uses a stripboard friendly grid.

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That is a "Mini-flex connector" (made by a few manufacturers.)

Why are the pins staggered?

The PCB terminals are staggered because the ribbon cable has half the pitch and half the rows of the PCB terminals. The cable has a 0.05 inch pitch in one row and the PCB terminals have a pitch of 0.1 inch and are in two rows.

If the PCB terminals had been in one row, then they would not be staggered, but the PCB pads would have to be spaced 0.05 inch, which would not leave enough space on the PCB for pads.

Having said that, there are connectors that offset the contacts by 0.025 inch one way or the other way so that the two rows of PCB terminals are in a regular grid. If you are able to replace that connector, use an IDC bump connector (my site).

IDC bump connectors

{My pictures}

And can it be soldered on a stripboard?

Not directly.

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    \$\begingroup\$ IDC connectors for 0.05" cable, most commonly have 0.1" pitch dual row pins. I think the staggered setup is the exception rather than the rule. \$\endgroup\$
    – colintd
    Sep 21, 2023 at 17:58
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    \$\begingroup\$ The cable is seperate. In the photo I connected the cable to the socket. My question is about socket with straggered pins. See the link in question to see the actual part. I want to solder tgat female socket to prototyping stripboard or veroboard. \$\endgroup\$
    – GNZ
    Sep 21, 2023 at 18:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ That wasn't clear from the picture. Sorry. I will correct my answer accordingly. \$\endgroup\$ Sep 21, 2023 at 18:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ I have ribbon idc male cable and need to connect one end to pcb. So I need a “PCB mount” female socket exactly as in my link. Only thing I don’t understand why they are stsggered. Im not sure I could explain my question still \$\endgroup\$
    – GNZ
    Sep 21, 2023 at 18:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ I. Explained. Why. They. Are. Staggered. And I told you that there is no easy way to convert a staggered connector to a straight grid connector. I also told you that, if you don't like a staggered connector, you can use instead an IDC bump connector. What else do you want? \$\endgroup\$ Sep 21, 2023 at 20:00
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Simply put, "standard" prototyping strip board, veroboard, and breadboard style generic pcbs are designed with 0.1" / 2.54mm throughhole spacing. This is a standard built from years of throughhole inline packages, and before the spread of cheap mass produced designed circuits.

You would not be able to use that specific pcb mounted connector on one of those standard strip boards, without modifying the board, modifying the connector, or replacing either.

0.05" pcb development boards are available if you really want to use that specific connector without modifying one. Or you can order breakout boards that convert 0.05 to 0.1 spacing.

0.05" is not an uncommon pin spacing for higher density connectors and parts. You can get them in throughhole even now, brand new from various manufacturers, but they also make them in surface mount options.

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