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I am developing and 3D printing a case for the development boards (PYNQ) we use at our university. However, I have read online that PLA is quite bad for ESD protection. I found products for anti-ESD filament (which likely emit more toxic fumes while 3D printing than normal filaments) and anti-ESD coatings. However, most of the products and information I found seem to be targeted at the use of ESD-safe LAB equipment, and I can not really seem to find anything about ESD protection mechanisms within the frame of mobile computers (like laptops) during their daily use. So my question is: do I really need to apply coatings or use ESD filament, or is that only required for LAB equipment?

I did, however, find that ESD bags and packages use conductive, dielectric, and anti-static layers to prevent ESD damage to the product, but that may be because overseas transportation may be rough, or because they use a kind of impact-protective plastic foam which causes a lot of static to form.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Will shielding spray adhere? It's really more of a problem during assembly or when someone is mucking around inside the box. \$\endgroup\$
    – DKNguyen
    Sep 27, 2023 at 15:56
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    \$\begingroup\$ In general, a well designed board will be much less sensitive to ESD than a component. Unless you are in an environment that generates a lot of high voltages, I wouldn't worry about it. \$\endgroup\$
    – Mattman944
    Sep 27, 2023 at 16:01

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anti-ESD filament (which likely emit more toxic fumes while 3D printing than normal filaments) and anti-ESD coatings.

Most likely not, usually the ingredient to making plastic conductive is just carbon. Carbon flakes, filaments and powder are used to make plastic conductive. Carbon isn't inherently toxic, my thoughts are it probably cuts toxicity because it would be more likely to react with many things or gasses.

and I can not really seem to find anything about ESD protection mechanisms within the frame of mobile computers (like laptops) during their daily use.

Usually a metal chassis is used, but any thick conductor will do.

I did, however, find that ESD bags and packages use conductive, dielectric, and anti-static layers to prevent ESD damage to the product

The best thing to do is use mylar coated bags if you want good protection. The pink or blue polypropylene bags only have a very thin layer of anti static material that can be rubbed off easily and then the product is exposed to plastic that can develop a charge (they still work but are one time use)

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